Humerus fracture - what are the chances of healing without surgery?

Humerus fracture. Some variables include location of the fracture, degree of displacement (position of fragments relative to one another), host variables (illnesses that may affect healing, smoker), ? Additional injuries (leg injury that may require need for arm walk with crutches). While many fractures will heal without surgery, repair of frwcture may help with pain and more rapid return to function. Good luck!

Related Questions

Humerus fracture - post surgery - heat/icey creams, what to do?

Humerus fracture. It depends on how far out u are from the surgery. Within the first 48 hours you should use ice then u can use heat if that makes it feel better. Creams can help with muscle pain. Read more...

I had surgery on a dismal humerus fracture three months ago. On the X-ray there's a screw broken, and my arm moves around in a circular motion, is this normal.

No. no that is not normal. distal humerus fractures can be difficult to fix. If a screw is broken it suggests that there is or was enough motion at the fracture site to overcome the mechanical strength of the screw. Sometimes the fractures can still go on to heal, but sometimes a revision of the surgery is required, ZDOnt hesitate to discuss with your surgeon. Read more...
No. fractures are temporary stabilized with internal fixation. In your case a plate and screws. The fracture needs to heal. If the healing does not occure you get a nonunion. If your fixation is failing eg broken screw. You may need another surgery. . Read more...
Not normal. Distal humerus fractures are often difficult to manage, fix and heal. It sounds like you may be describing a delayed union or failure of fixation (screw breakage). You need to be re-evaluated by your surgeon to make sure everything is healing appropriately. Read more...
No. Not sure what you mean by moving in a circular motion, but screws can break like any of that man-made material. It would be best to get evaluated by your orthopedic surgeon. . Read more...

What is the treatment for humerus fracture?

Too broad of a topic. I cannot answer this accurately. The humerus can be broken in three distinct areas, near the shoulder, the middle part of the bone, and near the elbow. Depending where the fracture is has huge impact on the options. There are non-operative and surgical options for fractures at all three locations but i cannot discuss in more detail without knowing more specifics about the fracture. Read more...

A 28 year-old man wishes to know if a tendon transfer is the only option for a wrist drop after a humerus fracture.....?

It depends. Sounds like you might have a radial nerve injury after a humerus fracture which unfortunately can be relatively common. Is it a post op nerve palsy? or was no surgery done to fix the humerus. How long has it been? If its been >6 weeks, an EMG can be helpful to see if there is any re-inervation. Make sure you are doing at least passive range of motion to avoid stiffness. We can set up a consult. Read more...
Radial nerve palsy. I assume you have had nerve testing to document that the radial nerve is not healing . Many times it will heal but may take up to 18-24 months. If it is regenerating then the nerve test will show that ,so hold off surgery for now if the test confirms nerve healing. If no sign of regeneration the other choices would be various types of wrist bracing vs a bone wrist fusion. Read more...
Tendon transfers. Can work extremely well for this problem. It is understandable surgery is not wanted but depeding upon the time frame sometimes transfers are done to maintain fucntion WHILE the nerve is healing Proper assessment of the level of nerve injury and if it is a complete or partila injury may change what is offered. SEE a HAND SURGEON to discuss in detail. Read more...
Some considerations. First, get updated EMG and see if any signs of re-innervation into distal muscles, and if there is a conduction block over upper arm at spiral groove or more distally at posterior interosseus level. If nerve is seemingly starting to recover, wait it out, as nerve regrowth goes at speed of fingernail growth, about 0.1 mm daily. Thus at 8 months may not be enough time. Also, might add a medical food such as MetanX, which has shown utility in diabetic nerve issues, and potentially might assist recovery in your case. If no evidence of good recovery potential, might explore nerve decompression proximally to see if post-traumatic neuroma is present. Read more...
Options available. Tendon transfers have classicaly been used for treatment of radial palsies with no spontaneous improvement after 6 months. For high radial palsies typically either Brand or Boyes tendon transfers are performed. Recent developments have been made with regard to nerve transfers from branches of the median nerve to branches of radial nerve leading to effected muscles to obtain muscle function. Success with this approach has been shown up to 10 months following injury. It does require searching out a tertiary medical center capable of performing the procedure. Nerve grafting to bridge area of injury is sometimes an option, usually done in concert with limited tendon transfers to maintain range of motion at wrist, fingers, and thumb. Seek out a board certified hand surgeon with microvascular training. Read more...
No. A tendon transfer, the use of an orthosis, or a wrist fusion are the primary options if there is no hope for recovery otherwise over time or with direct repair of the nerve. Read more...
Nerve exploration. Sounds like your radial nerve is not functioning and presumably injured at he time of your fracture. If it has not already been done emg/nerve conduction study should be done to see if any evidence of recovery, if there is it should continue to be observed with care taken to insure range of motion of wrist/fingers maintained. If no evidence that it is recovering could consider exploration of nerve w/ possible repair/grafting although no guarantee this will restore function and even if it did nerves take very long to recover. If this still didn't work could proceed with tendon transfer as final option. Read more...
Get a second opinion. Normally there is a good recovery in most of cases. Get second opinion, may be the radial nerve is entrapped and with surgery a full recovery is expected. Read more...
Consider electromyography. EMG can be very helpful to show whether the nerve is reinnervating (healing)or showing continuing denervation ( possibly cut or pinched ). Sensation is normal may indicate that the injury is partial… Tendon transfers can be very helpful even if the radial nerve wakes up, because it can save many months of waiting . Read more...
Some options. . . Generically, yes there are other options. Before agreeing to a tendon transfer you should have a recent EMG to see if there is any evidence of muscle reinnervation (the nerve regrowing to the muscle) if there is no sign by 8 months then it is likely that it will not return (*this is a gross generalization and I would have to examine you to give a full recommendation). The other option is a nerve transfer. The idea is you take a nerve from another muscle that works and plug it into a nerve that supplies some of the muscles not currently working. Now this sounds really cool and 'high-tech' but there is limited long term data about this technique. But to answer your question, yes there are other options. The other question you should ask is what are my best options. In general, the tendon transfers are a very reliable and proven intervention with good long term outcomes. Hope this helps in this complex situation. Read more...