How does non small cell carcinoma lung cancer get treated?

Multiple ways. Non-small cell cancers are a heterogenous group, with the two common types being squamous cell and adeno carcinomas. These are usually treated, depending on the stage and type, with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy.
Depends on stage. Stage i and ii lung cancer is treated with surgery up front. If the lymph nodes have cancer, then the patient may need chemotherapy after (adjuvant) surgery. For stage iiia the treatment is either chemo and radiotherapy followed by surgery or chemoradiotherapy alone. Stage iiib and IV the treatment is chemotherapy +/- radiotherapy.
Multiple ways. Non-small cell lung cancers are of two major varieties squamous cell and adeno carcinomas, along with a number of other less common types. Depending on the stage and type of tumor, surgery, radiation and chemotherapy are the usual options.
Multidisciplinary. Standard of care for stage i -iib nsclc is surgery. For stage iiia either chemotherapy +/- radiation followed by surgery or chemoradiation alone. Treatment is best by multidisciplinary and individualized with a targeted approach. The patient's overall health/fitness, tumor type, and molecular/genetic specifics should be considered to formulate best approach.

Related Questions

How can non small cell carcinoma lung cancer get created?

A cell goes wild! A cell is damaged by carcinogens, genetic failure and begins to multiply out of control and expands over time to a mass and then can spread very simple approach cancer is bad! Read more...
Non small cell lung . If possible, surgical resection is the first choice. This depends on how widely spread, ir at all, the cancer is. Second choices in therapy include radiation, chemotherapy, or cyber knife. Read more...

What is small cell carcinoma lung cancer with liver cancer stage 4?

Bad situation. Small cell is a very bad cancer. Stage four is very advanced. Very poor prognosis at best-- usually months only. Read more...

If you get non-small cell lung cancer, how do you feel?

You may feel normal! Many people present with vague symptoms or none at all if the cancer is caught in an early stage as an incidental finding on a scan done for another reason. The common symptoms associated with something going on in the chest are chronic cough (that may be productive of some blood), shortness of breath, chest pain or discomfort with a deep breath, fatigue, weight loss. Read more...
It depends; Unfortunately lung cancer is usually diagnosed in more advanced stages because it can be silent. Depending on the region it involves, symptoms could varry from cough, weight loss, shortness of breath, coughing up blood, affecting voice quality. If cancer is found incidentally in early stages( patient not symptomatic and cancer found incidentally), the cure rate can be excellent. Read more...
Depends. You could be asymptomatic-and the cancer was found accidentally during other routine work up for instance. In early stage, many times- it may not give you any significant problems. Symptom can include chronic cough, chest pain, coughing up blood, shortness of breath, weight loss, bony pain etc. Symptoms will be more in advanced stage. Read more...

If I develop non-small cell lung cancer, how will it be treated?

Depends on stage. If early stage the optimal therapy is surgical removal of a lobe or side of lung. This depends on lung function and age/health status. Radiosurgery if not healthy. If a later stage and patient healthy and young enough treatment with radiation and/or chemotherapy may lead to resection. If not then primary radiation and chemotherapy for stage 3. Stage 4 with chemotherapy and palliative radiation. Read more...
Depends on the stage. Once diagnosed you will need to be staged to evaluate for resection. In general patients with early stage lung cancer ( i or ii ), who are healthy enough , should be treated with surgery to remove the cancer. In the more advanced stages (iii or iv) , surgery by itself is usually not curative, and other treatments like chemotherapy and radiation therapy are required. Read more...
Depends on stage. There are IV stages of lung cancer with a iiia and iiib. Standard of care for stage i and ii is surgery. + chemotherapy afterward if tumor in lymphnodes. Iiia chemorads followed by surgery or definitive chemorads alone. Iiib and IV chemotherapy +/- radiation. Read more...

Is it normal to get only radiation and no chemo for stage 2 non-small cell lung cancer?

Depends. Your doctor looks at a lot of issues when considering how to treat you. They include your age, other medical problems and if they think you can undergo standard chemotherapy or radiation treatments. That said, if you are skeptical, you should always seek a 2nd opinion. Read more...
Also... Adding to dr. Noga's comments. If surgery is not an option, radiation therapy is standard treatment for (thoroughly staged) stage ii lung cancer. Chemo after surgery (if done) is also standard, but we know nothing of whether adding chemo to radiation if it is only the primary treatment. This question should be addressed by a team of lung cancer experts who know your situation well. Read more...
Not usual. Stage ii is divided into iia and iib, a being tumors less than 7 cm without nodes, and b composed of n-1 nodes + and tumors invading a resectable structure. Radiotherapy is not indicated in these cases post op, and can be used as stereotactic radiosurgery in people that cannot tolerate or refuse surgery. Stage ii is a puzzling category, but little established role for chemotherapy and xrt. Read more...

With inoperable non-small cell lung cancer, if there's a targetable genetic mutation (EGFR etc) can it be treated at stage 3A? Alongside chemo/radio?

Yes. EGFR mutations (exon 19 or 21) in lung cancer are more common in non-smokers, Asians, and women. Upfront use of an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) results in better progression-free survival than chemotherapy when these mutations are present, although overall survival is not different. Discuss options with your oncologist. Read more...
You have a fe Choice. Stage 3A lung cancer is often operable but does need systemic chemotherapy before or after surgery(preferably in the beginning). Please ask your oncologist if they could run a test for EGFR....it may be useful information to have in your treatment which should be as intensive and complete(use all possible) yet use the standard guidelines(no simultaneous use of targeted agent along with chemotherap. Read more...

Can people survive non small cell lung cancer?

Yes,depends stage. Stage 1 nsclc; surgical resection, appr70%5yrsurv stage2nsclc;surgery apprx. 30-35% 5 yr survival. Read more...

Can you tell me about non-small cell lung cancer?

Not enough space. Let's see: most common category of lung cancer, often but not always tobacco related, treated with surgery if possible but radiation and chemo are often used as well. I suggest you visit the national cancer institute website. It's has good info regarding all kinds of cancers. Read more...