How do doctors treat a mallet finger?

Splinting versus sur. Mallet fingers can be treated with splinting for up to 3 months. Surgery is also an option.
Usually a splint. There are only a few indications to operate on a mallet finger. Most mallet injuries are of the closed type and there is no bone injury(fracture). These injuries are treated with a splint. The treatment usually requires at least six to eight weeks of continuous splinting and the results are equal to operative "repair". Surgery maybe indicated for fractures or open injuries.
Mallet finger. is a tear of the tendon that attaches to the finger tip on the top and end of ones finger, such that if it is torn the tip of the finger stays flexed down, the injury can also involve a fracture were the tendon pulls off a small piece of bone at its attachment. treatment usual is splint the tip full tie 8 weeks part time 4. wks. http://www.handctr.com/mallet-finger-baseball-finger-102.html.

Related Questions

My Doctor told me I have Mallet Finger, it has been in a split for over 2 months now. It's still sensitive, how likely is it that I will need surgery?

Mallet finger. Is your doctor a hand surgeon? If not than I suggest you seek in person visit. The need for surgical intervention in "mallet fingers" depends upon the degree of injury. If after 6 to 8 weeks in splint there is still some degree of deviation than only surgery can correct.. Read more...

Has anyone ever treated from mallet finger?

Mallet finger. You should have an xray of the finger to check for fracture. If there is, need to make sure there is no evidence of joint subluxation. The vast majority of mallet fingers are treated with splinting of the finger fully extended straight. If fracture with subluxation, needs to be pinned. Good luck. Read more...

I have a mallet finger that never got treated. Aesthetically, it doesn't look great, but there is no pain. Should I have it looked at?

Your call. If the finger works fine and doesn't hurt, then it's totally your call on whether to get it fixed. Depending on the specif cause and how long it's been since it was injured, you may be able to have it splinted or you may require surgery to fix it. See your doc for an evaluation and possibly a referral to an orthopedist or hand surgeon. Read more...
No. If it doesn't bother you, leave it alone. Surgery would leave a scar and the finger will still be slightly bent. Read more...
Maybe. If the mallet finger is more than 3 months and you have full function, you do not need to get it looked at. If the injury is less than 3 months old, treatment is an option with splinting. Read more...

I have suspected mallet finger so what now?

Splint. Mallet finger is from rupture of the distal extensor tendon or a fracture of the distal phalanx. The finger should be x-rayed to check for a fracture. Most mallets are treated by splinting 24/7 for 6 weeks. Read more...

What are some common causes of mallet finger?

A mallet finger. Can be from a pulled tendon or a fracture. In both cases thre is incontinuity of the extensor tendon to the tip of the finger causing a droop as far as causes. It has also been called baseball finger ( hint there) i've seen it from making a bed . Basketball, workplace trauma sports, laceration , dog leashes, reigns from riding horses, falls . Torque feom machinery essentially any trauma. Read more...
Injuries. Mallet fingers usually come up after a forceful injury to the hand. Sometimes they are not noticed until hours after the injury. Often a ball hitting the tip of the finger or a gripping something that is pulled away can cause mallet finger. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: mallet finger?

Tear of the tendon. Mallet finger is caused by a tear of the extensor tendon at the joint closer to the fingertip. It happens most commonly from a trauma which causes sudden flexion of the joint. The patient will notice that a 'droop' is present with the fingertip and is unable to extend at the joint. The good news is that most can be handled nonoperatively with splinting anywhere from 6-8 weeks. See a hand doc. Read more...
Disrupted DIP. A mallet finger can be traumatic or degenerative in origin. Characterized by the disruption of the extensor complex to the distal phalanx. The tip of the finger remains in a flexed position with an extensor lag or inability to completely straighten the finger at the dip joint. Treated with splints or surgical repair. Read more...
Torn Tendon. A mallet finger is a tear of the tendon that brings the end joint on the finger up. These are treated with continual splinting for 6-8 weeks. Read more...
Torn extensor tendon. A mallet finger deformity occurs when a force is applied to the finger that tears the extensor tendon off the bone at the last joint. (dip joint). It may simply tear the tendon, or also avulse a small piece of bone. Most mallet fingers can be treated by 6 weeks of splinting the dip joint in extension. A qualified md should assess. Read more...
Tendon rupture. A rupture of the tendon which straightens the tip of your finger. This cause the finger to have a drooped appearance. Read more...

Need tips for someone who has suffered from mallet finger?

A mallet finger. Is when the extensor tendon at the tip of a finger ruptures. The rupture of this tendon can involve the tendon alone, be associated with a small bone fragment or fracture or can be associated with a fracture that requires significant care. The fingertip joint cannot extend and droops or lags despite effort to activley extend. http://www.handctr.com/mallet-finger-baseball-finger-102.html. Read more...

How do I fix a bony mallet finger?

Surgery. Most times the mallet finger is result of a fracture of the bone in the tip of your finger. The tendon that attaches to it has pulled a small piece of bone off. Surgery will allow repositioning of the bone and treating the mallet. Read more...