Effect of radiofrequency ablation treatment for heart arrhythmia?

Usually curative. In experts hands, the energy from radio-frequency waves can burn the abnormal electrical pathway or "short circuit" in the heart that is allowing the arrhythmia.
Rhythm dependent. It depends on the rhythm. For avnrt, wpw, "accessory pathways", "typical" atrial flutter, cure is about 96-98%, with lifetime recurrence risks between 2 and 11% depending on rhythm. For atrial tachycardia, ~85% cure rate w 1 procedure, variable recurrence rate. For atrial fibrillation, atypical macro-reentrant or left atrial tachs, 1 procedure cure rates can be as low as 50%.

Related Questions

With abnormal heart rhythms what are my treatment options?

Hard to answer. There are hundreds if not thousands of abnormal heart rhythms. Rapid heart types are usually called tachycardias and slow heart types are called bradycardias. There is a lot of variability in between. Your pcp is a great place to start and depending on what they say, may refer you to a cardiologist or other heart specialist. Read more...

Which non-invasive treatments can be used to treat abnormal heart rhythms?

Some, plus drugs. Depending on the cause & severity of the arrhythmia, relaxation techniques (medication, yoga, tai-chi) may be useful. Some anti-anxiety medications can be helpful as well. Beta-blockers are often used. Serious anti-arrhythmic agents are available, but some rhythm problems, especially in younger patients, may be amenable to electrophysiologic rx, like ablation, rather than lifelong drug therapy. Read more...
Cardioversion, meds. Use of anti-arrhythmic medications and shocking or resetting the heart (cardioversion) are non-invasive options. Read more...

Digitalis cure? Does digitalis cure abnormal heart rhythms or just treat it?

Digitalis . Digitalis does not cure abnormal heart rhythms, but can help stabilize the heart rhythm or heart rate. This medication is derived from the foxglove plant, and is one of the original western pharmaceuticals. In addition to the beneficial effects on heart rhythm, digitalis can also help the heart contract more strongly for patients with heart failure. Read more...
Not a cure. Digitalis is a medication that can improve some abnormal rhythms. The benefits it provides are only while receiving the medication. Read more...

When is? Digitalis? Used to cure abnormal heart rhythms?

Never. Digitalis is used to control the ventricular rates of some abnormal fast atrial arrhythmias or svt. In atrial fibrillation it is utilized to control the fast rate. It does not "cure" the problem nor does it actually prevent the atrial arrhythmias, as antiarrhythmic medications would. Read more...

Is digitalis used to cure abnormal heart rhythms?

No. No. Digitalis also referred to as digoxin can be used to treat symptoms of abnormal rhythms such as atrial fibrillation. It may help keep someone in a normal sinus rhythm or help control the ventricular rate. While it may help with symptoms, digoxin does not "cure" dysrhythmias. In fact, like most anti-arrhythmic medication, it can-especially at high doses- cause dysrhythmias. Read more...
Ask a cardiologist. Digitalis has a long history of treating congestive heart failure by stimulating the heart muscle. I believe it is used in patients with heart failure but with a normal sinus rhythm. Read more...

Heart arrhythmia question. How can I help my friend if she doesn't take her meds?

Can't. "you can lead a horse to water but you can't make him (her) drink." doctors face this problem every single day! if the rhythm problem is not of the life threatening type, your friend may simply find the symptoms less onerous than the medicines. So be it. Read more...
You probably can't. Unfortunately, many times we don't learn by other people's mistakes and no matter how much you try to convince someone of something or how much evidence you present, some people are just not ready to accept reality and their way to cope is to deny. Until your friend accepts that she has a problem (that can fortunately be treated or ameliorated with meds) she won't comply with the treatment. Read more...