Is there a noninvasive procedure to check for thyroid cancer or problems?

Not really. Even a blood test requires a needle stick -- and the needle stick for a fine needle aspiration of the thyroid gland is even smaller! symptoms say a lot -- but confirmation requires some sort of "invasive" procedure. Smile -- it is not so painful or difficult to do.
Yes. There is blood test to check if there is any problems with thyroid first initially. Then there is ultrasound to see any abnormality before biopsy is done .
First, Thyroid. Cancer is not very common. It usually shows up with a a nodule in the thyroid. The steps to work that up are thyroid function tests: tsh, t3 (liothyronine). A nuclear medicine and ultraound scan, and finally a biopsy which is invasive. Most types are slow growing and curable. Anaplastic thyroid is the rarest, and the worst.

Related Questions

I have diebetis and has thyroid cancer when should I have a cardiology check up?

Thyroid cancer not. Related to heart so.. Your primary care can do routine evaluation- high blood pressure, cholesterol issues, but most importantly whether you have symptoms of heart disease- short of breath , extra beats, shipping beats, chest pressure with exertion in absense of symptoms , many most primary care can follow-you until something new that worries them requires referral. Read more...
DiabetesCardiologist. Patients with diabetes are at high risk for heart disease and therefore should see a cardiologist regularly. At a minimum once a year to check lipids , a1c and get t least once a stress test. Thyroid supplements also can impact the heart and make it even more important to see both an endocrinologist and cardiologist. Read more...
When symptomatic. Even though you have a risk factor, until you have symptoms commonly associated with heart disease, I do not think you need evaluation of your heart. Followup with your primary md and he would be the best judge of whether you need to see a cardiologist. Read more...
Well care . There is no need to sera cardiologist unless you are having specific cardiac symptoms. Your pcp can determine if you need to see a cardiologist. Diabetes is a risk factor for CAD but that does not mean you need to see a cardiologist. Read more...

I'm doing a project for school and I am trying to find out treatments for thyroid cancer. Is there any standard procedures?

Yes. Surgery is the most important. Depending on the type, radioactive iodine is given. The most common type is papillary. There are other types, medullary, follicular, and anaplastic. Sometimes chemotherapy is given for anaplastic, however, this type commonly occurs in the elderly. Hope this helps. Read more...
Guidelines. You might want to read the guidelines from respectable organizations. Here is one from the american association of clinical endocrinologists. It can get very complicated but in general: surgery +/- radioactive iodine, then surveillance and repeat surgery or repeat radioactive iodine as needed, https://www.Aace.Com/files/thyroid-carcinoma.Pdf. Read more...

Thyroglobulin was checked in april was. 6 I and a papillary thyroid cancer patient. When should I retest the tg?

Depends. Different people test at different times, and there is no one right answer. Having had a thyroidectomy, you should be good and a test every 6 months to a year should be good. You should have your thyroid monitored at least every 6 months if it is stable. I see you have had trouble with that in the past. Sometimes it is difficult to regulate in a person with a thyroidectomy. Read more...
Variable. Most patients get thyroglobulin checked every 12 months. Every 6 months if there is a worry. I think a trend of increasing levels would be more worrisome. You and your doctors may discuss getting a stimulated level as well as radioactive iodine scan by making you hypothyroid or some may feel getting these tests with thyrogen stimulation could be done. Read more...

Diagnosed w pallilary thyroid cancer, braf v600e mutation detected. Shouldn't lymph nodes be checked before TT?

No. Once the diagnosis of Ca made the way the neck is to be handled is based on findings along the veins where the nodes are defined. The major approach is strictly to define the recurrent laryngeal nerve bilaterally and depending on the size and position of the tumor, total throid decided upon. Wlith nerves seen coming out of mediastinum dissection becomes simple and only clinical nodes removed. Read more...

How does a doctor know/DX thyroid cancer when all they check is your tsh?

More info needed. It is not possible to diagnose thyroid cancer from a TSH alone. A definite diagnosis is made with examination of a sample of thyroid tissue. Read more...
More to test. The TSH is not a test for cancer of the thyroid. Ask the doctor again if she/he was concerned about thryoid cancer and what tests were done to exclude it. Usually it starts with a finger exam of the neck. If there are no lumps or enlargements, doctors often don't do more tests for thyroid cancer. Read more...
Hopefully. your doctor will also feel your thyroid and consider an ultrasound if they feel anything abnormal. If you have simple hypothyroidism and are on appropriate doses of Synthroid (thyroxine) replacement, your chances for thyroid cancer are very low. Not zero, but very low. Ask your doctor. Read more...