What is laser photocoagulation and what effect does it have?

Need more info. Are you asking about retinal laser photocoagulaton, say for diabetes? Diabetic retinopathy has two stages which may be treated with laser photocoagulation; macular edema, the most common, and proiferative diabetic retinopathy are both treated differently by the same laser. "focal" laser is used to treat the leakage whereas "prp" is used to treat patients with proliferative diabetic retiopathy.

Related Questions

What is laser photocoagulation?

Laser photocoag. Laser energy is focused light energy of one wavelength. The light is absorbed into the target that is known to absorb that wavelength of light well, sparing other structures. The energy then is transformed to heat in the target and that seals up the blood vessel by coagulating it. Read more...
Used for eyes. Laser photocoagulation is a procedure that is used to control seepage from a damaged macula or a broken blood vessel. A laser is used to seal and coagulate the tissue around the point of the leak. Laser photocoagulaton is helpful in treating many different types of eye diseases, especially macular degeneration and other types of retinal issues. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: laser photocoagulation?

Laser coag. Laser coagulation or laser photocoagulation surgery is used to treat a number of eye diseases and has become widely used in recent decades. During the procedure, which is usually performed on an outpatient basis, a laser is used to finely cauterize ocular blood vessels to attempt to bring about various therapeutic benefits. Read more...

Would it be unusual for vision to be blurred a day after laser photocoagulation?

It depends. Patients that have focal laser or panretinal photocoagulation can develop swelling in the central part of their vision causing blurred vision. If this persists for more than a few days you should contact your treating physician. Occasionally patients need to be treated with medications to reduce swelling in the macula after laser. P. Read more...

Can laser photocoagulation be used to treat macular degeneration? I'm 65 and was recently diagnosed with macular degeneration. I want to do whatever I can to prevent myself from going blind. Is laser photocoagulation a safe treatment to cure my condition?

About . About 90% of patients with macular degeneration have the dry kind. Progression is usually gradual. The areds vitamins have been shown to slow progression by about 25%. In addition, a recent study showed eating fish at least once weekly reduced the incidence of macular degeneration. Laser photocagulation is not used to treat dry macular degeneration. The link below has more information. Read more...
Not really. Modern treatment of macular degeneration involves the use of laser photocoagulation less and less. Most people have dry macular degeneration which does not require surgical intervention. For those with the wet form, drugs are used much more than lasers today. Regardless of the treatment, we cannot cure macular degeneration currently. We can only manage it. Read more...

Can laser photocoagulation be used to treat macular degeneration? I was recently diagnosed with the "dry" form of macular degeneration. Is having laser photocoagulation a treatment option available to me, and would this prevent further vision loss? .

There . There are two main classifications of macular degeneration: dry and wet. The dry form is generally less debilitating, slower progressing and more common. The wet form generally has a much more profound effect on vision, is faster in its progression, fortunately less common and can vary greatly in treatment response. Treatment for the wet form can range from laser, a procedure called photodynamic therapy, injections into the eye (a relatively new form of treatment) and surgery. Now, treatment for the dry form is more controversial. It can range from simple observation, controlling one's lipid profile and a specific vitamin therapy. A type of laser procedure called ttt (transpupillary thermotherapy) has been used but with little success and traditional laser photocoagulation is not the procedure of choice for dry macular degeneration. Hope this helps. Read more...
There . There is no firm evidence that laser will prevent progression of vision loss with dry macular degeneration. There have been studies that showed that the drusen (yellow spots in the macula), when treated with laser, decreased in number. It is not known for sure what that means for the future of vision in these patients. Read more...
Standard . Standard of therapy for dry form of degeneration is observation. For the wet form of this condition there are several treatment options, one of which is laser photcoagulation. Read more...
Laser no help. Laser for dry macular degeneration has been studied well. Laser to the macula of dry amd patients makes drusen go away, so it looks better on exam. The laser does not change whether or not there is vision loss. Vitamin supplementation is the only proven preventive therapy, and reduces the risk of vision loss by about 25%. The vitamin formula now recommended is called areds 2 formula. Read more...