Had blood work done my white blood count was high to 19 should I be concerned?

It depends. Normal is about 13-14, so your white blood cells are pretty high. But it depends on which white cells are high. If neutrophils, that indicates bacterial infection or inflammation. Lymphocytes could mean a viral infection. Eosinophils could be related to allergies. Certain drugs like Prednisone can increase your white count. Do you have any symptoms that would point to an infection somewhere?
?19000. If you mean that your white blood cell count is 19000, this is quite high and needs to be evaluated for conditions like infection or bone marrow disorders. Your physician would know more as he/she would have more information about the rest of the complete blood count.
High. Normal is up to 10-11 depending on the lab. Infection is the most common cause. Discuss with your doctor who ordered the test and knows your symptoms and examination results.

Related Questions

I had some blood work done and my white blood count was high at 16.5 and my component neutrophils auto count was high to at10.9 what wrong.

Any fever? How are you feeling? Why did you do the blood work? Elevated w count reflects inflamation, infection or other disease..... Any lymph node swelling in the neck axilla or groin? Any cough, urinary symptoms, discharge, sweats, weight loss? What about the red cell count (hemoglobin? Platelets? What did the doctor say or do? Thank you.. Read more...

I just blood work done and my white blood count was very high. I don't get sick. But I am tired a lot.

Not sure of. Exact number. But increased white cells don't have to signal an infection. Stressors can cause this. Physical emotional etc. so follow with your PCP to make sure nothing else is causing the fatigue and lab values. Read more...

Liver function is abnormal I got my blood work done and in report it showed that my liver function is abnormal and my white blood count is little bit high, im confused about all this. I asked my doctor but she could explain me. But she said that there is n

Make . Make sure you were screened for hepatitis. Also liver function tests can be elevated due to excessive alcohol intake, certain medications, high triglycerides, viruses, and even gallstones. If your white count is high then maybe you had or are recovering from an infection. If your liver function tests were three times above the normal than some further investigating should be done. I would start by requesting an abdominal ultrasound. You can always ask to be referred to a gastroenterologist (GI) doctor, or just ask her to explain to you in detail what your results were and what tests she did and what the plan is for the future. All the best. Read more...

I am 59 years old had blood work done and my white blood count is 3.4 is it danger or is this normal?

Near normal. Your count is at the low end of normal, but it may be normal for you. You may need to do the test again in a few weeks/months to see if there are any changes. Should you experience an infection, see your doctor immediately. See this site for more info. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/complete-blood-count/my00476/dsection=results. Read more...
Probably normal. If you feel fine this is probably normal. A single lab value is not very helpful. Need to know what labs have looked like in past and under what circumstances this one was drawn. Were you sick or displaying symptoms? If so you most certainly weren't normal and your labs might be expected to be outside normal. Ask the doc who drew your labs for more specific advice. Read more...

Given 1 shot of depomedrol (methylprednisolone) on Mon blood work taken Thursday. Would the shot affect white blood count? Mine is high, but also haven't been feeling well

Depo-Medrol. Depo-Medrol is a brand of injected methylprednisolone (http://www.drugs.com/mtm/depo-medrol-injection.html). All steroids can increase glucose (sugar), thus aggravating (even causing) diabetes as well as causing temporary increase in white blood cell counts. Infection can also increase WBC. Follow up closely w/prescribing doc. Read more...