Can l5/s1 facet joint ligaments become lax?

Yes. If you are not working on your core muscles, overtime your ligaments in the spine can get lax resulting in extra wear/tear on the spine causing arthritis or pain in the facet joints.
Short answer: yes. Each segment of the spine is held together by the disc ;#40;shock absorber between the bones up front;#41; and the ligaments in the back ;#40;facet capsules, inter- and supraspinous;#41;. As the spine wears out ;#40;spinal degeneration;#41; both the discs and ligaments can become less stable, less supportive, and lax. This can lead to forward slippage of one bone over the next, called spondylolisthesis.

Related Questions

Is prolotherapy effective for strained l5/s1 facet joint ligaments?

Yes. Yes prolotherapy is well researched and offered treatment that has shown good success. The basic theory is to strengthen the ligaments around the facet joint and therefore reducing stress on the joint by tightening them up. Pretty cool stuff. Read more...

Could a strained illiolumbar ligament effect the l5/s1 facet joint?

No. Not exactly. The ileolumbar muscle is a different structure than the facet joint. However, you could potentially have an injury that affects both structures. Read more...

Is it ok to continue to train for triathlons with mild l5/s1 facet joint arthropathy (just right side) from an injury 6 months ago? I'm just 22

If U can do so with. ...No pain. Triathlon is stressful 4 ur back, especially the running ; swimming, biking is not. U can try ; if painful u will not do well. Read more...
Yes You Can. You will get over this. It is not over, at least not yet ;). Start a physical therapy/exercise program, remember start slow and take your time to get back to health and strength. Look at all those athletes out there in the world, they take their sweet time before getting back on the field. It must all mean something... Facet injections/Treatments are also helpful if you are not improving. Read more...

I have moderate bilateral l5/s1 facet joint arthrosis. Is arthrosis the same as arthriti? And is this a condition that will fully heal?

See details. The terms in this instance both signify osteoarthritis. It will not heal although the back pain can resolve over time or with appropriate treatment. Read more...
Facet Arthropathy. Could be facet arthropathy/arthritis. There are joints in the spine where the bones articulate and can develop bone spurs and cause pain typically with extension. I would consider seeing a pain/spine specialist to see if facet injections or radiofrequency ablation would be helpful for you. While arthritis/arthropathy will not change, the pain can be reduced or eliminated. Read more...

Is prolotherapy safe for a l5/s1 facet joint? I injured it 7 months ago and recently reinjured it. Feels loose and pops sometimes. Will it work?

Probably. Twenties male w. Low back pain ; "popping" probably w. Subluxing sacroiliac joint (sij). Facet disorder l5-s1 is radiological diagnosis, ; does not qualify as in-depth evaluation; which must include several physical exams. Facet joints are small ; do not pop. Sij is 17 cm squared ; largest joint in axial spine. Disordered sij's not dignosable by radiographs. Prolotherapy stabilization is worthy. Read more...
Yes. Yes prolotherapy is well researched and offered treatment that has shown good success. The basic theory is to strengthen the ligaments around the facet joint and therefore reducing stress on the joint by tightening them up. Pretty cool stuff. Read more...

Is prolotherapy effective for a a l5/s1 facet joint strain/ lig tear?

May well be the case. First, prolo- or sclerotherapy is an area of hot controversy, and may not be considered favorable where you live. However, I have experienced some amazing benefits when it has been used by a skillful osteopath or physiatrist. Facet instability may well respond but local facet blocks could also be considered. Good luck. Read more...
Yes. Yes prolotherapy is well researched and offered treatment that has shown good success. The basic theory is to strengthen the ligaments around the facet joint and therefore reducing stress on the joint by tightening them up. Pretty cool stuff. Read more...