Can a radionuclide bone scan miss degenerative disc disease, osteoarthritis and osteopenia?

Yes. The bone scan shows areas of active bone deposition as "hot". Osteopenia won't be diagnosed as this denotes loss of bone density. Degenerative disc disease and osteoarthritis may not be demonstrated if they are insufficient to cause a bone response (healing or what is medically called an osteoblastic response).

Related Questions

What are some things I can do to relieve the pain of osteoarthritis and degenerative disc disease in my neck?

Therapy, medications. Initial treatments for ddd and osteoarthritis of the neck include physical therapy, massage, medications. Some try acupuncture or chiropractic manipulation. If symptoms are more severe, consider pain management for stronger medications. Sometimes, despite all these treatments, symptoms are still there. Consider an evaluation by a spine surgeon to discuss surgery. Read more...
Therapy. The best long term treatment for neck pain from degenerative changes is strengthening and stretching exercise. Stretching will help maintain motion and strengthening the muscles will provide support for the worn joints and help delay progression. The best way to get into a routine is to work with a physical therapist a few times then transition to an independent exercise program. Read more...

How do degenerative osteoarthritis/degenerative joint disease/degenerative disc disease differ?

Arthritis vrs aging. Degenerative joint disease is an outdated term for osteoarthritis of peripheral joints. Degenerative disc disease is sometimes diagnosed when vertebral spurs are noted. The latter phenomenon, referred to most accurately as spondylosis deformans, is asymptomatic. It may be associated with disc disease, but disc damage does not necessarily cause pain. Read more...

I have degenerative disc disease in lumbar 4and 5 buldging outward disc in 2 and 3 and my pelvic bone is tilted to the left. What can I do to help pain?

Varies . It varies somewhat based on severity. In mild cases, controlling your weight, keeping you core strong, and avoiding activities that aggravate it may be sufficient. In more severe cases, there is a specialty known as pain management that have a number of nonoperative alternatives that can potentially help. Read more...