What type of bacterial infection is methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (mrsa)?

A bad type. Mrsa is a potent strain of staph bacteria that worries doctors because it is resistant to the antibiotic methicillin, which for many years was the single best treatment for staph infections. It is usually treatable with other antibiotics, such as Bactrim (sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim) or doxycycline, but such infections can be very virulent and contagious.
Contagious. A staph infection can be localized to one area or spread over large portions of the skin. Mrsa is more common and means that certain antibiotics will not work on this strain of bacteria. This infection is less serious in outpatient compared ot hospitalized patient. Treatment is antibiotics, antibacterial soap, intra nasal bactroban to lessen chances of recurrence.

Related Questions

If I have had a methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (mrsa) infection or been told that I carry mrsa, am I at high risk for developing a serious MRSA infection if I get seasonal influenza?

It is possible. Not all patients with a history of MRSA have problems after influenza. It is very important to inform your doctor if you experience a relapse of symptoms after influenza.Early recognition & proper treatment of MRSA is crucial in avoiding serious complications.#1 is prevention of influenza with vaccine, hand hygiene & cough etiquette.Severe MRSA infection without a prior history of MRSA is possible. Read more...
See below. If you are a nasal MRSA carrier you would be at increased risk for MRSA pneumonia complicating a case of influenza. In many cases colonization can be eradicated by topical treatment ie. Mupirocin ointment and hibiclens soap shower and shampoo, sometimes combined with oral antibiotics such as Minocycline or septra (sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim). Read more...

Could I get a boob job if I have nonactive methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (mrsa)?

MRSA . Mrsa once was a rare finding most often seen in the hospital setting. This is not the case, as MRSA is now almost universal. Many people are chronic carriers of the MRSA organism. If you are non-active, i feel that you could have breast augmentation. Pre-op you should consider nasal swab antibiotics, PO antibiotics and antibacterial body washes. This should reduce your chances for infection. Read more...
Yes. You can be a carrier of mrsa. However if you have episodes of active infections, placing a foreign body is a trap for the bacteria. Read more...
Yes. We all carry bacteria in and on our bodies. An active infection is a contra-indication to surgery, as this puts you at higher risk for developing a wound infection, or worse an infection around the breast implants. Infections need to be cleared at least two weeks, off antibiotics, before proceeding with any elective surgery. If there is any doubt, see an infectious disease doctor prior to surgery. Read more...
Higher risk. We always worry about MRSA infections around an implant in someone who is a MRSA carrier, like yourself. Speak with your surgeon or an infectious disease expert to ask about pre-op decolonization, and the role of anti-mrsa antibiotics for your surgery. Read more...

Are school-children a high-risk group for staphylococcus aureus infection or mrsa?

Yes, Staph, no MRSA. Young children, especially, who have close contact with others in daycare and ealy school, often bring home staph, (impetigo, respiratory, ear infections), but since most communities do not have alot of mrsa, it is the more common staph that they get and bring home. Read more...
Yes. All staph infections, including mrsa, are spread through skin contact. Because of their close proximity to each other, kids in school are a high risk group over-all, and the younger ones are more at risk as they tend to touch each other more and wash their hands less. Read more...

Is a MRSA UTI infection contagious to others by airborne bacteria emanating from the patient by them coughing, etc?

Maybe, not airborne. When someone has a staph infection (MRSA or not), other people in the same household often are at somewhat increased risk. It's not so much airborne, but from skin surfaces, which typically are contaminated with staph no matter where the main infection is; and from skin, household dust and surfaces often are contaminated. Common sense hygiene (hand washing) and housecleaning help reduce any risk. Read more...
No. MRSA may be present on the skin or in the nose of otherwise healthy people. For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Drink enough water daily, so that your urine is mostly colorless. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any form. Practice safe sex, if you have sex. Read more...

I had MRSA. Doc said use Hibiclens but she also told me that using antiseptic soaps can kill normal bacteria leading to more infections? Is this true?

Yes. Hibiclens will kill all types of bacteria on the skin, but it is sometimes necessary to use this strategy if you, or any close contacts, are getting recurrent skin infections with staph bacteria (incl MRSA). In order for this to work, all close family contacts should be treated. Also, nasal carriage of staph should be addressed. If not, the skin can quickly recolonize. Read more...

Once a person is infected with the MRSA infection and is treated, does that bacteria stays in the body forever?

Sometimes. Sometimes, if your immunity is low, you may harbor MRSA especially in the nasal cavity. Then you are called a carrier of the infection. Usually it can be treated with Mupirocin ointment. Read more...
Yes and no. Some people become a carrier of MRSA and it stays in nose and fingernails forever. Incidence of this is 1-2%. Once you are treated it may or may not show up ever, 99% of time first MRSA infection is completely cured. If you get recurrent MRSA infection have your physician swab your nasal cavity to rule out carrier state. Read more...