How long do I ask off if I have to undergo for an hallux valgus correction operation.?

Depends on procedure. This is an important question to ask your doctor. Recover depends on the type of procedure. Some ways of fixing hallux valgus will allow you to walk on it right away and others may require 6 weeks or more of crutches. It also depends on your work. If you sit at a desk you might need 1-2 weeks off. If you do heavy labor then you might need 3 months.
Talk to your Surgeon. These are the kinds of questions that should be addressed with your operating surgeon pre-operatively because the answer can vary widely depending on the type of procedure planned.
It depends. Their are many different types of bunion procedures. If its a "head procedure" then you can ambulated immediately and probably do a sit down job. If a mid shaft, base or fusion type of procedure it involves being off loaded anywhere from two to three months and probably can do a sit down job. So find out the severity of your bunion and what course the foot and ankle surgeon is opting for.
It depends... It depends on many factors including your age, general health, healing ability, severity of the deformity, and procedure preformed. Speak with your surgeon and seek their advice.

Related Questions

Now I have to undergo for an hallux valgus correction operation, should I be concerned?

Follow dr's advice. Make sure you allow yourself a smooth recovery without any setbacks - follow the instructions! Read more...
Concern. Any concern is worthy of your concern. As stated follow directions and realize that young are a big component of your care and the resulting outcome. Read more...
Usually this is an . Elective procedure. You don;t have to do it, you do it only if you want to. Read more...

Have to undergo an hallux valgus correction operation. What should I expect from the surgery?

There are . Literally over a hundred different bunion surguries.....you need to pick a doctor you feel comfortable with, they will take xrays evaluate your foot and explain to you your options. Read more...

What do I need to know about undergoing a hallux valgus correction operation?

HalluxValgus Surgery. Depending on the degree of hallux valgus there are many different types of surgery that may be appropriate for you. You may have a screw inserted in the bone and you may be able to walk on the foot the day of the surgery. You need to be evaluated by a podiatric surgeon to determine the appropriate procedure for your foot. Newer surgical techniques create much less pain than in years past. Read more...
See below. There are many different procedures so ask your surgeon to discuss the one chosen for you. Read more...
Bunions. Bunions or hallux abducto valgus deformities are found very often today in both males and females. There is a genetic component to getting them too. Bunions are treated both conservatively and surgically. Some conservative treatments include injections and custom devices. If these don't help then a surgical solution is recommended. See your podiatrist for further guidance. Read more...
Few males require su. Few males require surgery as shoe styles can accommodate the bunion. New othopaedic procedures have a greater chance of patient satisfaction. Primary goal is pain free status-not 4" narrow toed shoes. Read more...
Bunion surgery. Unfortunately, there are no braces or exercises to get rid of a bunion. If you elect to have it surgically removed, there are several ways your surgeon could go about it. Depending on the angle of your bones (you'll need an x-ray), there are many different procedures to choose from to correct your foot. The more aggressive procedures may require crutches and a boot afterward for several weeks. Read more...
Bunion. X-rays will determine what type of procedure is chosen for you. There are many different procedures and your surgeon will explain what is best for you and possible complications. Read more...
Consult with surgeon. Risks of any surgery include possible: pain swelling, numbness, infection, reaction to medication, hardware failure, blood clot, alteration of gait, joint stiffness, delayed healing, non healing, scar overgrowth, and possible need for further future medical or surgical intervention. Consult with your surgeon on the exact type of procedure and what to expect for that particular procedure. Read more...