5 doctors weighed in:

What is a frozen section? Does it diagnose cancer?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Martin Rubenstein
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Quick tissue check.

When tissue is removed at surgery, the pathologist might need to look at it under the microscope if cancer is suspected.
Since the tissue needs to be sliced thinly to look at it, the quick way is to freeze the tissue, then slice the fronzen specimen. Hence frozen section. Most of the tissue is imbedded in parafin, and processed later, the permanent section. The permanents are more accurate.

In brief: Quick tissue check.

When tissue is removed at surgery, the pathologist might need to look at it under the microscope if cancer is suspected.
Since the tissue needs to be sliced thinly to look at it, the quick way is to freeze the tissue, then slice the fronzen specimen. Hence frozen section. Most of the tissue is imbedded in parafin, and processed later, the permanent section. The permanents are more accurate.
Dr. Martin Rubenstein
Dr. Martin Rubenstein
Thank
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Pathology

In brief: Intraoperative test

If a lesion is seen during surgery, part of the lesion can be examined by a pathologist.
The tissue is frozen and cut into thin sections that are examined microscopically to provide a provisional diagnosis. It can be used to diagnose cancer, but results are considered preliminary. In practice if the pathologist diagnosis cancer on frozen section, surgeon with treat it as such.

In brief: Intraoperative test

If a lesion is seen during surgery, part of the lesion can be examined by a pathologist.
The tissue is frozen and cut into thin sections that are examined microscopically to provide a provisional diagnosis. It can be used to diagnose cancer, but results are considered preliminary. In practice if the pathologist diagnosis cancer on frozen section, surgeon with treat it as such.
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Inderjit Deol
Frozen section is performed on nodules/masses in the body during surgery to make a diagnosis of cancer or noncancerous by a pathologist. Yes, it can diagnose cancer. After making this diagnosis, the tissue s processed for final result that may take one or two extra days depending upon further studies to be performed.
Read more answers from doctors