6 doctors weighed in:
Is there a relationship between Asperger and dysgraphia?
6 doctors weighed in

Dr. Glen Elliott
Pediatrics - Psychiatry
3 doctors agree
In brief: No
Dysgraphia, which simply means bad handwriting, is completely different from and unrelated to asperger's disorder or autism.

In brief: No
Dysgraphia, which simply means bad handwriting, is completely different from and unrelated to asperger's disorder or autism.
Dr. Glen Elliott
Dr. Glen Elliott
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Dr. Johanna Fricke
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Motor clumsiness in
Kids with aspergers often manifests as robotic walking, lacking normal arm swing.
It can include deficits in manual dexterity. Executive function deficits including poor motor planning are seen in as +/- adhd some with as have non-verbal learning disabilities. Poor visual-spatial processing & propriokinesthestic sense, "feeling" where one's body parts are, can cause dysgraphia; hypotonia also.

In brief: Motor clumsiness in
Kids with aspergers often manifests as robotic walking, lacking normal arm swing.
It can include deficits in manual dexterity. Executive function deficits including poor motor planning are seen in as +/- adhd some with as have non-verbal learning disabilities. Poor visual-spatial processing & propriokinesthestic sense, "feeling" where one's body parts are, can cause dysgraphia; hypotonia also.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Thank
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral
In brief: If they have low
Muscle tone ( low resistance to passive movement) with delayed fine motor skills, for which they require occupational therapy, they later have abnormal pencil grips & dysgraphia.
On neurodevelopmental exam, finger agnosia (not being able to mimic touching the correct finger to their thumb " by feel" indicates a deficit in proprioceptive-kinesthetic sense. This is not specific to autistic disorder.

In brief: If they have low
Muscle tone ( low resistance to passive movement) with delayed fine motor skills, for which they require occupational therapy, they later have abnormal pencil grips & dysgraphia.
On neurodevelopmental exam, finger agnosia (not being able to mimic touching the correct finger to their thumb " by feel" indicates a deficit in proprioceptive-kinesthetic sense. This is not specific to autistic disorder.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Thank
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