I am wondering how do doctors treat people with diseases like narcolepsy, sleep apnea or chronic fatigue?

It varies. For sleep apnea, the most common treatment is a pap device - it splints the airway open to prevent the repetitive airway blockage that fragments sleep. For narcolepsy, typically we utilize stimulant therapy and sometimes a medication called xyrem. It would be important to determine the correct diagnosis and then develop a treatment plan with your physician.
Sleep apnea. Sleep apnea can be treated by losing weight, avoiding sleeping on one's back, wearing a device that forces oxygen into the lungs ( cpap) or a custom made dental device that holds the jaw forward to open the airway. Chronic fatigue may be related to sleep apnea, however, it might be a thyroid problem. Seeing an md for a proper diagnosis is essential to the proper care.

Related Questions

Are chronic fatigue and sleep apnea related?

Apnea + fatigue. People with sleep apnea can be chronically fatigued, but not everyone with chronic fatigue has sleep apnea. Fatigue is a feeling of mental of physical exhaustion but is not the same as sleepiness. Sleepiness is the likelihood someone will fall asleep given the opportunity. You can be fatigued but not sleepy. Mention these symptoms to your physician so they can help you work through them. Read more...
Sleep apnea. Sleep apnea means that a person is stopping breathing for at least 10 seconds, many times a night. That means they aren't getting enough oxygen to replenish their brain and their muscles. Short answer - there is a direct link between chronic fatigue and sleep apnea. Read more...

Is it possible for a man to chronic fatigue syndrome? I do have sleep apnea and struggle with my cpap machine, but fatigue seems to be getting worse.

Fatigue. Daytime sleepiness and fatigue is one of the most common symptoms of sleep apnea. It is usually the presenting sign that leads to further testing. Addressing the sleep apnea first would be the best step moving forward before trying other treatments. . Read more...
Chronic Fatigue. Yes. The EBV virus that has been linked in past to "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome" is not particular to male or female. You also describe other reasons for fatigue with Sleep apnea. There are newer machines that work very well. Read more...
Start with CPAP. If you know that you have sleep apnea, I would work with the medical supply store and your specialist to find a mask that works well for you to maximize your CPAP and then see how your fatigue improves. Read more...
Chronic Fatigue. Sydrome (CFS) is a complicated disorder characterized by extreme fatigue that can't be explained by any underlying medical condition and to date has no known specific cause. Sleep apnea and any chronic condition including heart disease, diabetes, arthritis and depression can all cause fatigue. Please discuss with your doctor. Refer to http://www.cdc.gov/cfs, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002224/ Read more...
Yes, it is possible. You have several reasons to suffer from chronic fatigue syndrome. I would start by speaking with your sleep apnea specialist regarding titrating, or optimizing, the settings on your cpap machine. This should be done at least every 2 years and especially if you begin having new symptoms. Read more...

L renal failure due to reoccurring reflux. Dx= crohns, sleep apnea, COPD, chronic fatigue, anxiety. What could cause all of this? No answers so far!!!

Need a consultation. It's likely that your conditions are not all coming from a single source. A physician would need to know more about your medical history, social history and specifics surrounding each complaint in order to give helpful advice. You may want to have a Health Tap Virtual on line consultation.A VIDEO/PHONE consultation or an INBOX TEXT consult is best. A real time text consult is not the best for you. Read more...

Why does diagnosis of sleep apnea exclude diagnosis of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome? Especially in cases where CPAP fails to remit daytime sleepiness and lassitude,

Sleep apnea. You ask a tough question. It seems you are not responding well to CPAP and are not sleeping all that well. I would start by going back soon to the pulmonologist and let him/her know what is not working well for you. Things may not happen overnight but the team will work diligently with you so that things come in to order. Please let me know how things work out. Read more...
It doesn't but. Since sleep apnea alone is associated with fatigue, one needs to make sure that this is treated adequately. However, having one condition does not preclude one from having another. Read more...

What can I try to do for fatigue on my own before I see the doctor? Have sleep apnea but sleep doc doesn't think it's the cause, cortisol & TSH normal

Fatigue. Things to consider: is your sleep apnea treated? If not, try breathe right nasal strips to see if they help. Otherwise the most common cause of fatigue is chronic stress, anxiety, or depression. Try to build some relaxation into your life (meditation, relaxation exercises); avoid caffeine; get enough sleep; improve your diet making sure you get enough vitamins and iron. Read more...
Fatigued or sleepy. It is important to determine of you are fatigued or sleepy. Sleepiness is the likelihood you will fall asleep given the opportunity. You can be fatigued but not sleepy. If you need help deciding google the epworth sleepiness scale and answer the questions. A score above 10 means you are sleepy. If you are sleepy you need to treat your sleep apnea no matter how mild. Read more...