Can a child have breast milk from a mother who has breast cancer?

Probably not. It would not be a good idea to do this since some breast cancers may involve the very ducts that the milk flows down from. It would be wise to check with your doctor on this.
Yes ,not recomended. Breast milk will not transmit cancer to the child, babies do not have any higher incidence of breast cancer in later part of life, however physicians do not recommend breast feeding mothers with cancer. Cancer medication, radio isotopes will pass into milk also.Htlv-1 virus. Breast ca transmission is seen in mice but not in humans.

Related Questions

If a patient has breast cancer and breastfeeds her child, do the stray cancer cells in the milk have any effect on her child?

Unlikely. The stray cancer cells in breast milk of a woman with breast cancer are not likely to be viable. Even if viable, such cells are likely to get digested in the stomach. However, it is probably not a good idea to feed a baby on the breast that is known to have cancer as cancer tissues often release products that are not healthful and may be harmful. Read more...
NO. Studies cancer cell will not pass into milk and will not give cancer to the child even in later part of life . However doctors will not recommend breast feeding , the medication , radio isotopes will pass into milk and effect the child.. Read more...

If a mother has breast cancer and she is breastfeeding, what is the effect to her baby?

Breast cancer. If she is receiving therapy for breast cancer - chemo, antiestrogen pill etc- it is recommended for her not to breast feed. There is potentially side effect to the baby like immunosuppressant etc . Read more...
There is no effect. Breast cancer cells cannot be transmitted to a baby by breast feeding if they were in the breast milk they would be killed by the stomach acid. Read more...

I binge drank from 20-25 years old. Mother had lobular breast cancer at 52, I had first baby at 26 and stopped drinking. Should I get breasts removed?

No. Be thankful for stopping drinking. The extra risk is minimal if any. Keep up surveillance like any other woman. Get any mass biopsied without delay. Your chance of breast cancer killing you will be quite small and prophylactic mastectomy will not eliminate it. Enjoy the life that you are rebuilding . Read more...

My mother has breast cancer. Will she die?

Yes. Everyone dies, but fortunately most people who are diagnosed with breast cancer don't die as a result of their breast cancer. Read more...
Breast ca prognosis. Prognosis of breast cancer will depend on the stage, the type/biology of cancers/ other prognostic markers. All of us will die sooner or later. However, not everybody with breast cancer will die from the breast cancer. Without any information it is hard to say about one's prognosis. Please discuss with her oncologist in detail. Nobody knows about one's fate- only god knows. Read more...
Depends on stage. Death from breast cancer, like for most cancers, depends on stage and type of cancer, treatment given and the genetic make up of the individual. Early breast cancer is curable. Read more...

Is soy milk safe for breast cancer patients?

Unknown. It is unknown for estrogen receptor positive (er+) breast cancers. Soy has estrogen-like properties. In lab studies, some soy products have caused breast cancer cells to die, while other products have caused the same cells to grow. I tell my patients not to take soy supplements in the form of extracts, pills, or powders, but if they enjoy drinking soy milk they may do so, in moderation. Read more...

What can be done to deal with your mother having breast cancer?

Local & Online Help. Everyone is different , so there is no one correct answer. There are many local & online resources. Some of the reputable ones are a) american cancer society b) komen foundation also, see if there are local support groups in town. Lastly, consider seeking out a private psychologist. Read more...

Is it possible that I get cancer if my mother has breast cancer?

Increased risk. Having a first degree relative with a history of breast cancer can increase your risk of breast cancer, colon cancer and ovarian or prostate cancer. It is important to get regular screening exams. Read more...
Depends. It is important to find out how old your mother was and if there are any other members of your family with breast cancer. I recommend meeting with a breast surgeon or going to a high risk breast clinic for evaluation and possible meeting with a genetic counselor to determine your risk for breast and/or ovarian cancer. Read more...