9 doctors weighed in:

If you have your tubes tied and now have cervical cancer is it possible to have another child after you get rid of the cancer?

9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Warner
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Usually

Depending upon the treatment required for the cervical cancer, women can usually have a child after this diagnosis and treatment.
Reversal of the fillopian tube proceedure is also often possible, so neither of these events are absolute contraindications for having another child, but of course the physician needs to go through the specifics of your case to tell you your fesability.

In brief: Usually

Depending upon the treatment required for the cervical cancer, women can usually have a child after this diagnosis and treatment.
Reversal of the fillopian tube proceedure is also often possible, so neither of these events are absolute contraindications for having another child, but of course the physician needs to go through the specifics of your case to tell you your fesability.
Dr. Robert Warner
Dr. Robert Warner
Thank
Dr. Joseph Woods
Pathology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Yes.

It depends on the extent of cervical cancer.
If you have localized cancer, like carcinoma in situ, this can be removed by cone biopsy. The cervical tissue grows back, and then in vitro fertilization and artificial insemination can be done. This would likely be the best/only way since tubal ligation involves removal of a piece of each tube, and scarring can cause obsruction on both sides.

In brief: Yes.

It depends on the extent of cervical cancer.
If you have localized cancer, like carcinoma in situ, this can be removed by cone biopsy. The cervical tissue grows back, and then in vitro fertilization and artificial insemination can be done. This would likely be the best/only way since tubal ligation involves removal of a piece of each tube, and scarring can cause obsruction on both sides.
Dr. Joseph Woods
Dr. Joseph Woods
Thank
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Radiation Oncology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Treatment for

Invasive cervical cancer, as opposed to in situ, includes radical hysterectomy or radiotherapy.
..Neither complatible with normal ovulation and and implantation if the ovaary prodcuces an egg, and since the tubes are blocked, it could not be fertilized. Perhaps have eggs harvested for surrogate pregnancy? Ask your gyn onc and convey your question and concern.

In brief: Treatment for

Invasive cervical cancer, as opposed to in situ, includes radical hysterectomy or radiotherapy.
..Neither complatible with normal ovulation and and implantation if the ovaary prodcuces an egg, and since the tubes are blocked, it could not be fertilized. Perhaps have eggs harvested for surrogate pregnancy? Ask your gyn onc and convey your question and concern.
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Peter Kurzweil
Board Certified, Internal Medicine
46 years in practice
16M people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors