How much does it usually cost for back surgery to for bulging or herniated disk?

Back surgery. The cost for back surgery is typically higher in the hospital than in an outpatient surgical center. The cost for fusion surgery such as artificial disc replacement or intervertebral body fusion is much higher than a simple discectomy. If you are a cash paid patient, you should expect the global cost for 1 level lumbar spine surgery is between $20k to $30k.

Related Questions

My bf had back surgery because he had a bulging disk (5l) that herniated. We are ttc. Suggestions?

TTC BACK SURGERY. If i understand ttc means trying to conceive, if thats is correct, than back surgery is not going to interfere with you getting pregnant, because of his condition, as long as he can have sex.If ttc foryou mean something else, still have agood time and write back again good luck. Read more...

How painful is it? After lower back surgery for a herniated disk?

Moderatly Painful. Typical discectomy surgery is done through a small incision with careful dissection of the muscles on the back of the spine. Patients vary but usually this results in moderate surgical pain. Often, but not always, the nerve pain from the disc will improve quickly. There will be more back pain if a more extensive discectomy was required. Severe pain is concerning and should be evaluated. Read more...
Not awful. People with a really bad radiculopathy often wake up from surgery feeling better, happy to trade postoperative pain for the radicular pain. Patients typically go home same or next day with oral pain medications. Read more...

What are the symptoms? After lower back surgery for a herniated disk?

Vary. Most patients after simple laminectomy/discectomy for a herniated disc report significant pain relief. There may be continued areas of soreness or back pain even with successful surgery. There can be associated leg/foot weakness, which is more likely with pre-op muscle issues. If symptoms continue, talk with your doctor. Read more...
Usually none except. Most disc surgeries are successful when done for primarily sciatic pain in a non smoker, 90-95%. There is usually some incisional pain based on the size of incision. There may or may not be some residual pain in the leg usually due to ongoing nerve irritation from its prior compression by the disc or by the manipulation during surgery. Sometimes, there can be residual neurologic symptoms . Read more...

How will your back feel after lower back surgery for a herniated disk?

Ins. 6 weeks like a back strain gets better quickly leg pain goes away quickly. Read more...
Usually just ... Usually this is just incisional pain of up to 2 weeks duration.. If there was back pain equal to or worse than leg pain pre operatively, then you most likely will not get much improvement of your back pain & all bets are off if you are a smoker. However, about 10% of disc surgery patients can experience back pain due to ongoing degenerative changes in disc over time with a 5% risk of reherniation. Read more...

What should I know about having back surgery for a herniated disk?

Think twice. If you have fairly recent onset of pain and loss of sensation radiating down your leg to your foot with weakness, urinary incontinence, diminished knee or ankle reflexes, and a herniated disc at the appropriate level on an MRI or ct scan, there is a good chance that surgery to remove part of the disc or bone squeezing the nerve exiting the spine will help. Unfortunately many patients do not have e. Read more...
Conservative. Most patients with a diagnosis of disc herniation do not need surgery. Unless there are significant neurologic symptoms such as severe or progressive weakness, and bowel or bladder changes, non-op management for up to 8-12 weeks can sufficiently alleviate most patients. If symptoms do not get better or recur, then properly indicated surgery should help. Read more...

31 yr old female, L5 herniated disk. What can I do as far as back surgery? The laser spine institute? Hurts so bad

Varies. I would not hesitate to be seen. The vast majority of patients with disc herniation a do respond to nonoperative care, but a small percentage do require surgery, which in general is highly successful for the appropriate candidate. Read more...