8 doctors weighed in:

When is it smarter to get a root canal or to get the tooth pulled instead?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Nishan Odabashian
Dentistry - Endodontics
3 doctors agree

In brief: Save 2th if possible

If the tooth is salvageable, that should take precedence over extraction.
See multiple specialists to get different opinion. An microscope using endodontist, periodontist and your general dentist should be involved in the decision. I would do everything to save my tooth.

In brief: Save 2th if possible

If the tooth is salvageable, that should take precedence over extraction.
See multiple specialists to get different opinion. An microscope using endodontist, periodontist and your general dentist should be involved in the decision. I would do everything to save my tooth.
Dr. Nishan Odabashian
Dr. Nishan Odabashian
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Nishan Odabashian
The operative word in in my response is "if". None of the dentists, specialists, experts on this panel (including me) can give a definitive answer to this question w/out examining the pt, radiographs, & taking each pt's needs, & wants first. However, 'IF' it is possible to save a tooth, then that is the best option. Important thing is to understand that it is a complex question.
Dr. Maryam Chiani
Dentistry
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Saving teeth

It is always smart to save a tooth that is restorable and has a good long term prognosis even if you get a root canal treatment.
Make sure you discuss all the options and ask for the long term prognosis of the tooth in question to make an informed decision.

In brief: Saving teeth

It is always smart to save a tooth that is restorable and has a good long term prognosis even if you get a root canal treatment.
Make sure you discuss all the options and ask for the long term prognosis of the tooth in question to make an informed decision.
Dr. Maryam Chiani
Dr. Maryam Chiani
Thank
Dr. John Calvert
Dentistry
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Non-restorable

If a tooth is decayed or damaged to the point that it is not restorable with a functional crown that has a high level prognosis for many years, then other options probably need to be looked at.
If the tooth must be extracted, usually the best way of replacing the tooth would be with an implant. There are various criteria that must be met for this, but your dentist or specialist can advise you.

In brief: Non-restorable

If a tooth is decayed or damaged to the point that it is not restorable with a functional crown that has a high level prognosis for many years, then other options probably need to be looked at.
If the tooth must be extracted, usually the best way of replacing the tooth would be with an implant. There are various criteria that must be met for this, but your dentist or specialist can advise you.
Dr. John Calvert
Dr. John Calvert
Thank
2 comments
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Again we get back to the concept that everyone's different. What works for your neighbor may not be right for you. Dr. Calvert is correct, discuss your unique situate with your Dentist for the best advice.
Dr. Nishan Odabashian
The operative word in in my response is "if". None of the dentists, specialists, experts on this panel (including me) can give a definitive answer to this question w/out examining the pt, radiographs, & taking each pt's needs, & wants first. However, 'IF' it is possible to save a tooth, then that is the best option. Important thing is to understand that it is a complex question.
Dr. Sal Aragona
Dentistry

In brief: Depends

If you are relatively young (14-18) and you have a well formed third molar behind the second molar, sometimes it might be better to remove the second molar instead of saving it with root canal treatment.

In brief: Depends

If you are relatively young (14-18) and you have a well formed third molar behind the second molar, sometimes it might be better to remove the second molar instead of saving it with root canal treatment.
Dr. Sal Aragona
Dr. Sal Aragona
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Nishan Odabashian
Agreed; Age of the pt. & location of a tooth in question as well as its carious state are important. A 3rd molar can be transplanted into a socket of another molar if the 3rd molar is not fully developed. With the help of an orthodontist, a 3rd molar can be guided (moved) into the 2nd molar position. Also important to note, implants aren't placed into patient's jaws that are not fully developed!
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Peter Kurzweil
Board Certified,
47 years in practice
16M people helped
Continue
111,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors