How do you breathe with whooping cough?

Normal unless coughi. With whooping cough, when the patient is not coughing the breathing is perfectly normal. The cough is spasmodic and continues until there is very little air left in the lungs and when the patient then breathes in the whooping noise is made.

Related Questions

What can I do to breathe better with whooping cough?

Get treated... Also known as pertussis, treatment with Azithromycin will be important - this will decrease the duration of illness and contagiousness. Other treatment strategies such as epinephrine, steroids, and nebulizing treatments have not been consistently effective in getting people to breathe easier. Read more...

For about 2 weeks I have hada "choking cough" where I can't breath AT ALL. Sometimes productive with clear thick sputum. Could this be whooping cough?

Needs checking. Whooping cough can be contracted by young adults like your age due to waning immunity by this time from primary immunization many years ago. Signs of whooping cough are similar and due to its contagious nature, especially to vulnerable populations of the young and the elderly, you should see your doctor sooner to get it checked and be treated. Read more...

Whooping cough as a post-viral phenomrnon. Breath shortness, lack of sleep?

Not well yet. See your doctor again. There may be residual virus or another problem. An exam, naybe ests will Dx. More Tx is needed to ease breathing. Don't delay. Older folk can take more effort and time to recover from illnesses. Best! Read more...
Possible. Two simple tests, the direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test on the nasal secretions, and CBC with differential, as well as the 3 classic symptoms - 1) 'whoop' noise with inspiration after cough, 2) paroxysms of coughing, or many back to back cough episodes without a break, and post-coughing vomiting, all help to make the diagnosis. Read more...

My child makes a whooping sound when he breathes in. Does that mean he has asthma?

No. Whooping after a severe coughing spell may be a sign of pertussis, or whooping cough, it is not a sound made by a child with asthma. Read more...
No. If your baby is truly making a whooping sound when he breathes in, he might have pertussis, or whooping cough. Pertussis causes episodes of coughing fits, often accompanied with a whoop upon breathing in. These babies have a hard time breathing and eating. Pertussis can lead to apnea, in which the baby stops breathing. You should see a doctor immediately if your baby is whooping. Read more...
No. (not necessarily). Inspiratory "whooping" or high pitched sounds with breathing may be seen with respiratory tract infections (rti) in infancy. Asthma typically presents with expiratory wheezing and chronic cough. Asthma is a difficult diagnosis to make in young children since many children will wheeze with rti's but not develop persistent asthma. Speak to your doctor if these symptoms persist. Read more...
No. Any child who is making noises (other than just a stuffy nose) while breathing should see the doctor to find out the reason for the noise. If such a child is having trouble breathing, or looks very uncomfortable, parents must call 911 for an ambulance and oxygen. Asthma sounds are "wheezing" noises, which generally occur as a child breaths out. Read more...
Yes. Whooping sound when baby breathes in does not mean asthma. Nasal congestion and laryngomalacia may make a whooping sound when baby breathes in. Usually with laryngomalacia babies are happy but noisy. Asthma gives you a sound (wheezing) during expiration and usually causes severe cough, breathing difficulty. If nasal congestion use saline nasal drops/suction. Read more...
No. The whooping sound is the rapid breath in after a severe bout of successive coughing. Whooping cough is an infection and is not related to asthma which often causes a wheezing sound when breathing out. Cough by the way is the most common symptom of asthma, so if in doubt have your child checked by your doctor. Read more...
No. Traditionally, the "whooping" sound describes pertussis, or whooping cough. Inspiratory (breathing in) sounds are usually associated with upper airway swelling, most commonly croup. Asthma is usually a long "haaa" sound when breathing out, but can be heard on inspiration if severe. Children with breathing difficulties should of course always be brought in for medical evaluation. Read more...
No. Asthma causes wheezing, which is a high pitched sound on exhalation (breathing out), not inhalation (breathing in). When there are sounds made with inhalation, it usually means that there is a narrowing of the upper airways- in the larynx and trachea. There are many possible causes for this, including croup and laryngomalacia. If your child is having problems breathing, call your pediatrician. Read more...
No. Noise when kids breathe in is called "stridor" or whooping. Examples are croup and whooping cough. Noise in their lungs when they breathe out is usually called "wheezing" and is what we hear with asthma or with certain viral infections that cause wheezing only during the infection(cold) itself. Both noises should be heard by an md, however. Causes range from annoying to serious. Read more...
No. Asthma is usually a breathing out noise, except in its more severe form when patients wheeze breathing in and out. All abnormal breathing should be evaluated by your doctor-other conditions to consider include inspiratory stridor from croup, tracheomalacia, whooping cough, or a foreign object in the windpipe. Read more...

What is a whooping cough?

Infection of lungs. Whooping cough is named for the horrible repeated sequence of short coughs followed by a dramatic whoop or vibratory noise from the airways as baby takes a deep breath.It is caused by a vaccine preventable bacterial infection of the lungs that produces lots of sticky mucous baby coughs out to get air.Adults, even if immunized as kids, can get it, be asymtomatic & give it to babies who may die. Read more...

What are the symptoms of whooping cough?

Depends on age. Whooping cough is caused by pertussis and symptoms follow 3 stages: catarrhal-runny nose, sneezing, low fever; paroxysmal-dry irritative hacking, eye-bulging, strangling, uninterupted "machine gun" cough every hour. Convalescent-symptoms diminish but can persist for 100 days. A "whoop" sound on breathing in can occur in children, but most teens and adults just cough without the whoop. Read more...

What are the symptoms of the whooping cough?

Whooping cough. This special respiratory infection is very dangerous to our young children. Knowing about it is very wise. One with whooping cough probably has a high fever, is under some distress and the cough is a very high pitched unique sounding cough. I would bet you could go to google or you tube and find some audio examples to know the special cough this diagnosis is named for. Read more...