How can I tell if I have an indication for carpal tunnel surgery?

Constant symptoms. Once symptoms have been constant for 6 months, it's hard to resolve them with non-operative treatment. Loss of muscle bulk in the thumb or complete loss of sensation in the digits is an indication for operative treatment. Oral/injectable steroids, splints and or therapy are used to treat symptoms. If symptoms continue after these treatments, surgery is indicated.
Conservative failure. If splints, meds, rest and cortisone fail and you have a positive emg/ncs then you may want to consider surgery.
U can not. Let your doctor decide.
Symptoms. Symptoms that are present daily - not responsive to proper splints, associated with wasting of muscles or loss of function and or very painful generally require surgery. Everything else may wait at your discretion.
Atrophy/dysfunction. Generally it comes done to permanent damage such as muscle atrophy or injury or interference with function as well as the presence of permanent lesions which will not respond to non-surgical treatments.

Related Questions

Tell me about successful carpal tunnel surgery?

Carpal Tunnel Q ; A. Some common questions and answers regarding carpal tunnel surgery http://www.Handctr.Com/carpal-tunnel-syndrome-q-a.Html. Read more...
Good results. Carpal tunnel surgery is an option if you have been thoroughly evaluated by a specialist, the diagnosis has been confirmed with nerve studies and you have failed appropriate conservative measures. Having said that, the surgery had a good success rate. Read more...

Is the carpal tunnel surgery a risky thing to do?

Surgery. All surgeries are associated with risks. If there is an indication for it, it means that the benefits are outweight by risks. In the hand a professional the risks are minimall while the benefits are obvious.So is surgery risky? Yes, all the time. Is it worth it? Yes if needed. Discuss with your doctor in details the risks.He is your best resource.Hope it helps. Read more...
Anesthesia. From an anesthesia perspective, it is pretty safe. Options range from local only to general anesthesia. Surgery is short with minimal blood loss. As for risks like nerve damage, you'll have to ask your surgeon. Read more...
Carpal tunnel. Agree with dr dezaliu, that any surgery has risks. However, carpal tunnel release can provide outstanding benefits of decreased pain, numbness, and tingling with potential for improved funciton. Check with your orthopedic surgeon. Read more...
Risk vs Benefit. The answer to your one-sided question is yes. There are risks to everything we do, even crossing the street, but if we never cross the street, we can't accomplish much. The questions to ask your doctor are, what happens if we don't do the surgery? What are the benefits, and chances of improvement if the surgery is performed? What are the risks and how often do they occur? Be fully informed. Read more...
Here is video. www.youtube.com/watch?v=m4hty1vyrxg. Any operation has common and uncommon risks and benefits. Read more...

What are some complications of carpal tunnel surgery?

Hopefully nothing. This is fairly routine, superficial surgery and complications are rare. It is theoretically possible to cause damage to surrounding nerves or blood vessels in addition to usual risks (infection, poor wound healing, etc), but these are rare. Read more...
Many but not common. Infection, bleeding, scarring, pain, numbness, tendon injury, muscle atrophy, nerve injury, wound separation, incomplete release and more. Read more...
Not common. The success rate for carpal tunnel release to treat cts is very high. However, complications can occur. The most common complications are wound healing issues, infection, delayed bleeding , and nerve injury. Read more...