Is it possible to have lupus and not have butterfly rash?

Yes. Though the butterfly rash on the cheeks is common, it is not always present. Some patients may never have an evident malar rash (the technical name). Interestingly, the name of the disease, which is latin for "wolf, " is based on the fanciful idea that the rash makes faces look wolf-like.
Absolutely. Many presentations of sle are very different. A malar rash is only one of many presenting clinical problems. Only 30 percent of sle pts coming to a rheumatogist have the rash. I suspect it is higher for dermatologists.

Related Questions

What is the lupus "butterfly" rash?

Cheekbones rash. Systemic lupus erythematosus, sle, lupus, is an auto-immune disorder in which a person's immune system is reacting strongly against parts of his own body. The inflammation caused by the immune system reaction (hypersensitivity reaction) leads to the lupus symptoms, including the butterfly rash (malar rash). The rash is more likely to occur, and seems to worsen, after exposure to sunlight. Read more...
Malar Rash. The malar rash of lupus is red or purplish and mildly scaly. Characteristically, it has the shape of a butterfly and involves the bridge of the nose. Read more...

I was wondering is a butterfly rash always from lupus?

No. It is one of eleven criteria to diagnose , but in itself it can be due to many less harmful things including normal reaction tossing. Read more...

Can you have lupus without the classic "butterfly rash"?

Yes. In reality, only a minority of lupus patients have a classic "butterfly" rash. Less specific rashes, joint pain, fatigue, sun sensitivity, and many other symptoms can raise a suspicion of lupus. The diagnosis is usually confirmed by laboratory testing. If the diagnosis is unclear, consult woth a rheumatologist. Read more...

Is a "butterfly rash" common in all those afflicted with lupus?

Yes it is common! But 50% of sle patients do not get the rash. Also, I have had patients with a positive ANA and acne rosacea referred as possible lupus patients. Read more...