Are fungal infections worse with people with diabetes?

Yes. Diabetic patients are much more susceptible to fungal infections from superficial skin infections to gas-producing urinary tract infections to a severe sinusitis. In general though, infection risk in diabetic patients seems to be minimized by proper glycemic control.
Not always. Certain fungal infections, such as vaginal candidiasis, are more common in diabetes, but not all types of fungal infections are more frequent in diabetics (http://sgoti.Ws/ouktrx). Some types of fungal infections, such as seen in invasive otitis externa, are almost exclusively found in diabetics (http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pubmed/19069086).

Related Questions

I have diabetes and have started getting fungal infections on my nails. Is this a serious problem?

Yes, sometimes it is. Diabetics tend to get poor circulation in the feet, poor healing in the feet, and less effective infection-fighting ability from their immune systems. With such problems, fungal infections can spread more easily, spread more deeply, and be harder to treat. Toenail fungus infections can be treated by a primary care doctor, a dermatologist (skin doctor), and/or a podiatrist (foot doctor). Read more...
Toe nail fungus. The toe nail fungus is not a serious problem, it is more of a nuisance . Non-diabetics also get fungal toenails and are treated the same way as diabetics for this condition. With this said diabetics immune system is more compromised than a non-diabetic and have a tendency to get more infections , fungal and bacterial. Keep your blood sugar under control, that's your best defense. Read more...
Diabetes. It is serious because the nail can cause a serious toe infection which can escalate into a more serious conditions such as necrotizing facsiitis and gangrene which can lead to amputation. You should see a foot specialist every 3 months to get your nails debrided properly. Read more...
Have it treated. There are topical and oral antifungal medications available for the treatment of nail fungus. Specialized lasers are also now available for treatment of fungal nail infections. Have your nails evaluated and get the appropriate treatment. Read more...

I have this weird itching, burning. Needle pin, numbness feeling all over my body usually much worse at night. Fungal infection?

Unusual sensations. Make sure these aren't side effects of medication or OTC supplements or medications first. Then see your doctor for a good thorough neurological exam to rule out sensory neuropathy. You may need to have your vitamin B12 level checked as well as your bilirubin. Read more...

Is it ok too exercise whilst treating a fungal infection around inner thigh area, or will this just slow the healing process and make it worse?

Keep exercising. Exercising will not slow the healing process, and in fact may hasten it. The biggest risk of exercising with a fungal infection is contaminating clothing or equipment, resulting in spreading of the infection on you, or transmission to someone else. Keeping the site covered during your work out can halp prevent this. Read more...
It may slow healing. Fungus tends to grow in warm, damp, and dark environments. Exercising should be OK, as long as you keep the area clean and dry, immediately afterwards. It may slow healing process, but the main thing is to keep the area clean and dry regardless of exercise. Also, use your medications as directed by your physician. Read more...
Ok. If the exercise causes rubbing, and moisture, a good shower and reapplication of medication will negate the problem. Losing weight from the exercise will help preclude the tendency to pick up the fungus. That said, use your judgement as to what works best for you. Read more...