For the recurrence of endocarditis, any possible treatment other than heart surgery or taking anti-biotics for life time? Success examples?

Endocarditis. If endocarditis recurs, especially after valve replacement surgery, it is very difficult to eradicate. This is because the antibiotics are unlikely to ever fully contact the artificial valve. The reason why antibiotics are prescribed for life, is that as soon as they are stopped, the infection of the valve is likely to blossom again. Surgery is the treatment of choice for infected artificial valve.
Well. . . Antibiotics are your first line, and you may need them for quite a while. If you do not respond or the endocarditis has sufficiently damaged a valve, you may need surgery. Remember, endocarditis is a very serious condition. Talk to your doctor and do not be afraid to get a second opinion. It is your life and body, after all.

Related Questions

For the recurrence of endocarditis, any possible treatment other than heart surgery or taking anti-biotics for life time? Success examples?

Sorry. I don't know of any other treatments. Medicine is changing every year. If i could advice you as a family doctor, continue your treatment pattern with antibiotics and surgery if needed. Also our health community is working on treatments for you and maybe tomorrow your day will be there. Keep yourself as healthy as possible until your answer comes. Read more...
Endocarditis. Bacterial endocarditis can destroy heart valves and may even spread to the heart muscle with abscess formation thus it can be lethal. The treatment is prolonged antibiotics to eradicate the bacteria and possible valve replacement if the valve is sufficiently destroyed to pose a risk to life. Read more...

Is there a waiting period for heart surgery after having endocarditis w/pulmonary embolism?

Stable condition. To have surgery, patients need to be in stable condition. For someone who had endocarditis and pulmonary embolism, that means that both the infection and the pulmonary condition needs to resolve completely, and that your vitals are stable. In addition, surgeons may require that your blood pressure be brought under control before they clear you for surgery. Read more...
Several weeks. If it is an emergency, doctors will make do with what they got. Otherwise, if the situation is stable, two things need to happen. First, recovery from the embolism with at least 4 weeks of effective anticoagulation. Second, complete control of the infection (endocarditis) with 6 to 8 weeks of antibiotics, followed by blood cultures to confirm clearance of the infection. Read more...

I've had previous heart surgery, am I more susceptible to getting endocarditis?

Maybe. It depends on the type of surgery , success, and if you get appropriate pre treatment prior to dental work if indicated. Read more...
Depends. On type of surgery, success and if indicated appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis prior to dental work. Read more...
Depends. . If your heart surgery involved placing prosthetic material in your heart, like a valve replacement, for instance, this does increase you're risk of endocarditis. Talk to your doctor about this as well as your need for antibiotic prophylaxis. Read more...

I have endocarditis caused by aspergillus, is heart surgery necessary?

Depends. If valves are infected they may not be salvegable and surgery will be necessary for survival. Read more...
Usually. Aspergillus endocarditis is generally fatal without a combination of surgery and antifungal therapy. Read more...