Can my child get vaccines if she has an egg allergy?

Yes. Only mmr, chickenpox, and flu vaccines have any egg in them at all, and the amount is so tiny that even in highly egg allergic children, serious reactions are extremely rare.
Yes. Most vaccines have no egg. Live virus vaccines and flu vaccines may contain small amount of egg. Aside from flu vaccine there is little risk of severe reaction. Flu vaccine can be administered in small additive amounts with close observation if there is a history of life threatening reaction to eggs.
Yes. The only vaccine that may need to be avoided is influenza vaccine. However, only rare patients with a history of severe egg allergy have to avoid influenza vaccines (but can have all other routine vaccines). If you eat eggs without problems, then you may get influenza vaccination. See your doctor or allergist if you need help deciding if it is safe to receive the flu vaccine.
Yes. Most of the children with egg allergy could tolerate the minute amount of egg in the influenza vaccine. A small percentage may have an allergic reaction (~1-3% risk) -- most allergic reaction tend to be mild . A pediatric allergist could give a test dose of a vaccine in the office and to make sure its safe to get a full vaccine. If your child is >4Y.O. There are low-egg flu shots on the market.
Yes. Yes - only MMR and flu shots may have been manufactured using egg embryos.However, good studies have shown that egg allergic children can safely receive MMR vaccine and the CDC says to do so. Influenza vaccineis different. This virus is also grown in eggs. The CDC states that people with a severe egg allergy shot not get flu shots.
Yes. A few vaccines use eggs in the manufacturing process, but the remaining vaccines are fine for egg-allergic children. A parent should discuss with the doctor which vaccines to avoid. An allergist can test the child to see if he/she reacts to the vaccine, and then if there is no reaction, the child can get the vaccine at the allergist's office.

Related Questions

Can someone with an egg allergy get a vaccine?

Yes. Flu vaccine is produced in eggs. The last flu pandemics have taught us that the amount of egg protein in flu vaccines is negligible for most egg allergy patients; however desensitization or dose challenge is recommended for those with severe reactions as a precuationary measure. Read more...
Depends. Agree. Patients with egg allergy receive most immunizations in their pediatrician's office including MMR vaccine. There are, however, some vaccines that contain egg such as the flu vaccine and yellow fever vaccination. For the flu vaccine, we generally recommend that an egg allergic individual be evaluated by an allergist prior to administration and determine a plan based on an individual basis. Read more...

Could someone with an egg allergy get the h1n1 vaccine?

Yes. Egg allergic individuals, with very few exceptions, can receive the flu vaccine. Protocols are published by the cdc and in jaci that address this issue and how to dose and administer the flu vaccine in this population.E. Read more...

How is it that I can get the h1n1 swine flu vaccine if I have an egg allergy?

Some ok with vaccine. Many people have only mild allergic reactions to eggs, and some people say the had past egg allergies but now eat eggs without problems. For the mildly allergic, they can get blood-tested and skin-tested. If egg allergy shows up on the tests, they can still talk to the allergist about trying a flu shot under supervision at the clinic. People with severe egg allergy should not get the vaccine. Read more...
Research and experie. Becuase research and clinical experience has shown that most people with true egg allergy are not having issues with flu shots, either when half dosed or full dosed. The current recommendations are available for your doc to work through these concerns with you and to see if you can get the shot. See ww.Cdc.Gov for more info on egg allergies and flu shots. Read more...
Evolving Answer. The past 2 -3 years has seen an change in the thoughts regarding egg allergy and flu vaccine. What has been clear is that almost everyone with egg allergy can get the flu vaccine. What has evolved over the past 1-2 years is how that vaccine should be given. This needs to be discussed with your allergist. If someone tells you that you can't get the flu shot b/c of egg allergy, seek another opinion. Read more...
No egg in vaccine. Viruses used to make influenza & MMR vaccines are grown on hen's eggs. The manufacturing process removes all egg from mmr. A few lots of flu vaccine retain traces of egg & may cause problems in patients with egg anaphylaxis. Most such patients can receive flu vaccine with appropriate safety measures either skin testing to vaccine before injection or vaccinating in 2 doses, the 1st a low test dose. Read more...