22 doctors weighed in:
Can my child get vaccines if she has an egg allergy?
22 doctors weighed in

5 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
Only mmr, chickenpox, and flu vaccines have any egg in them at all, and the amount is so tiny that even in highly egg allergic children, serious reactions are extremely rare.

In brief: Yes
Only mmr, chickenpox, and flu vaccines have any egg in them at all, and the amount is so tiny that even in highly egg allergic children, serious reactions are extremely rare.
Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
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Dr. Irwin Berkowitz
Pediatrics
4 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
Most vaccines have no egg.
Live virus vaccines and flu vaccines may contain small amount of egg. Aside from flu vaccine there is little risk of severe reaction. Flu vaccine can be administered in small additive amounts with close observation if there is a history of life threatening reaction to eggs.

In brief: Yes
Most vaccines have no egg.
Live virus vaccines and flu vaccines may contain small amount of egg. Aside from flu vaccine there is little risk of severe reaction. Flu vaccine can be administered in small additive amounts with close observation if there is a history of life threatening reaction to eggs.
Dr. Irwin Berkowitz
Dr. Irwin Berkowitz
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Dr. Douglas Tzanetos
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
4 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
The only vaccine that may need to be avoided is influenza vaccine.
However, only rare patients with a history of severe egg allergy have to avoid influenza vaccines (but can have all other routine vaccines). If you eat eggs without problems, then you may get influenza vaccination. See your doctor or allergist if you need help deciding if it is safe to receive the flu vaccine.

In brief: Yes
The only vaccine that may need to be avoided is influenza vaccine.
However, only rare patients with a history of severe egg allergy have to avoid influenza vaccines (but can have all other routine vaccines). If you eat eggs without problems, then you may get influenza vaccination. See your doctor or allergist if you need help deciding if it is safe to receive the flu vaccine.
Dr. Douglas Tzanetos
Dr. Douglas Tzanetos
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Dr. Eli Silver
Pediatrics
3 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
Most of the children with egg allergy could tolerate the minute amount of egg in the influenza vaccine.
A small percentage may have an allergic reaction (~1-3% risk) -- most allergic reaction tend to be mild . A pediatric allergist could give a test dose of a vaccine in the office and to make sure its safe to get a full vaccine. If your child is >4Y.O. There are low-egg flu shots on the market.

In brief: Yes
Most of the children with egg allergy could tolerate the minute amount of egg in the influenza vaccine.
A small percentage may have an allergic reaction (~1-3% risk) -- most allergic reaction tend to be mild . A pediatric allergist could give a test dose of a vaccine in the office and to make sure its safe to get a full vaccine. If your child is >4Y.O. There are low-egg flu shots on the market.
Dr. Eli Silver
Dr. Eli Silver
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Dr. Marcus Degraw
Pediatrics
3 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
Yes - only MMR and flu shots may have been manufactured using egg embryos.
However, good studies have shown that egg allergic children can safely receive MMR vaccine and the CDC says to do so. Influenza vaccineis different. This virus is also grown in eggs. The CDC states that people with a severe egg allergy shot not get flu shots.

In brief: Yes
Yes - only MMR and flu shots may have been manufactured using egg embryos.
However, good studies have shown that egg allergic children can safely receive MMR vaccine and the CDC says to do so. Influenza vaccineis different. This virus is also grown in eggs. The CDC states that people with a severe egg allergy shot not get flu shots.
Dr. Marcus Degraw
Dr. Marcus Degraw
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Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
A few vaccines use eggs in the manufacturing process, but the remaining vaccines are fine for egg-allergic children.
A parent should discuss with the doctor which vaccines to avoid. An allergist can test the child to see if he/she reacts to the vaccine, and then if there is no reaction, the child can get the vaccine at the allergist's office.

In brief: Yes
A few vaccines use eggs in the manufacturing process, but the remaining vaccines are fine for egg-allergic children.
A parent should discuss with the doctor which vaccines to avoid. An allergist can test the child to see if he/she reacts to the vaccine, and then if there is no reaction, the child can get the vaccine at the allergist's office.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
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