Can I get HIV in other ways besides sexual intercourse?

Yes, several ways. The most common way to get HIV is thru unprotected sexual intercourse. However, other ways include sharing hiv-infected needles (often associated with using illegal injection drugs, rarely with tattooing but possible), receiving infected blood transfusions or blood products (though the blood supply is screened thoroughly these days), and passing HIV from mother to child thru breastfeeding.
Any blood exchange. You can get it mostly via blood contact such as sharing contaminated needles or through a cut.

Related Questions

Can you get HIV after just a few minutes of sexual intercourse?

Yes. Any unprotected sexual contact without barrier protection, even for short amounts of time, can lead to HIV transmission if there is any exchange of bodily fluids, which we usually think of seminal fluid. However, this may also include vaginal discharge, pre-cum from the penis as well. Hiv can be transmitted via oral sex, too. Thus, transmission can also occur in the absence of orgasm. Read more...

How do I know if I have my first sexual intercourse with another virgin at our marriage, could we get hiv-aids?

Depends. Just having sex does not cause hiv. A person can only have risk of gettinghiv through sex, if the other party has hiv. The common ways to get HIV are through unprotected sex with an infected person, sharing needles with infected persons and other ways of exposure to body fluids of infected persons. Read more...

I had lab work done and non reactive came up on the HIV test. I've only had sexual intercourse with my wife of 7 years. Do I need to get tested again?

HIV. No. Unless your wife has become HIV+ or is having unprotected sex with someone other than you. You need not be tested again unless you have some risk factor (i.e., unprotected sex with an individual other than your wife, receive an untested blood transfusion or organ transplant, or inject yourself with a needle that has been used by an HIV+ person, and so on) Read more...
More info, please! Couples in monogamous relationships for over a year, w/negative HIV tests at that point, are at almost no risk for HIV IF there's no other risky behavior. Whether you should retest depends on your trust that the relationship is mutually monogamous & neither person does risky activities. HIV can spread by sharing needles, oral sex, anal & vaginal sex. See http://tinyurl.com/n52s8kk. Read more...

After the sexual intercourse how many months we have to wait to know we don't have HIV 100% please reply for me 3 years finish until now I am getting neg-?

You're good. If the screening labs were not positive after six months, you have a duty to yourself to stop worrying and get on with living. For shorter times, or if you are crippled by HIV anxiety, pay for a nucleic acid probe. Please consider a short course of psychotherapy to eradicate a fear that i believe you recognize is senseless; doing this will improve your live in other ways as well. Read more...

How reliable is the 20min fast HIV test? If it's negative 3 months after last sexual intercourse?

Very. They are reported as "over 99%" accurate. That is for all who might test. If you might be in a very high risk, then the accuracy might be off a little. If worrisome, you can repeat at 6 months, which is the length of occupational exposure surveilance for medical personnel who contact blood or bodily fluids. Read more...

If a person who is HIV positive has sexual intercourse with another HIV positive person does it affect them?

Possibly. Hiv infected individuals often carry other sexually transmitted infections such as gonorrhea/chlamydia/hepatitis b/c, trichomonas, bacterial vaginosis etc, so those can be transmitted. Although, the most prevalent viral type of HIV is 1, there is also type 2 HIV virus that is prevalent in certain parts of africa and is not typical for north america, but coinfection is a possibility, albeit rare. Read more...
It can yes. There is a phenomenon known as "swarming". Its the replacement of one strain of HIV for another more virulent one. Read more...