Mother had lobular breast cancer at 52-- post menopause. Negative for brca genes, atm, p53, cdh1, etc. Is there a strong likelihood i'll get it a well?

Possible. Various causes result in breast cancer in a family. If BRACA is neg then there is no genetic relationship to getting the Ca. Exposure to the MMTV virus probably results in 80% chance of having a tumor. Also recognized that endogenous sequences of virus can be passed and when proper reorganization of the sequences takes place, the viral genome can induce cancer.
It may be possible. Some genetic changes leaves a patient more susceptible to breast cancer. However, i believe it's more important what your genetic profile is than your mother. There is clearly a familial link in breast cancer. You should check with a breast surgeon in your area, or a general surgeon with a special interest in breast disease, to find out more.

Related Questions

My mother had lobular breast cancer at 53. Does this mean ill get it? Is the lobular variety more likely genetic? I'm brca negative.

Probably not, no. The lobular variety has similar genetic risk as other varieties. Your mother having breast cancer does mean you have greater than average risk but it is still much more likely that you won't get it than you will. Many genes besides BRCA affect risk, but diet and lifestyle still has a greater influence on risk than genetics. See http://tinyurl.com/zwgadg2 and http://tinyurl.com/zg66ou7. Read more...

How many relatives need to have had breastcancer before you should get genetic testing for the BRCA genes? My mother contracted breast cancer, I am 40

Other factors must . be considered. If your mom had a harmful BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, breast cancer diagnosed before age 50, cancer in both breasts, both breast and ovarian cancers, multiple breast cancers or your ethnicity is Ashkenazi Jewish, talk to your GYN about genetic counseling to evaluate your potential risk. Read more...
Usually 2. With some exceptions, the number is two first-degree relatives (mom/sisters), before screening for BRCA. Exceptions include if there is a history of ovarian cancer, pre-menopausal breast cancer (age . Read more...
See genetics. Most breast cancer is NOT due to an inherited risk, but rather occurs by chance. Family history that suggests an inherited risk, such as changes in the BRCA1 gene or BRCA2 gene, include multiple relatives with cancer over more than one generation and younger ages of onset. If you are concerned about an inherited risk, see a geneticist who can assess your family history. Read more...

Mothers mom had pancreatic cancer at 72, dad had colon at 87, she had had lobular breast cancer at 54. I've had brca testing- negative. Am I at risk?

Doubt. With the negative BRCA tests, your risk of these is much lower. They may identify other genetic tumor markers for these as time goes on. Remember, the majority of colon cancer is found in persons without a family history for it. Read more...
Some risk. There is some risk even though you don't have the BRCA gene mutation. If your own parents, instead of your grandparents, had these diseases your risk would be greater. A geneticist can advise you better,however. Read more...
Not extra risk. Keep up surveillance like everybody else, and good luck. Read more...

My mom had lobular breast cancer at 52. Brca negative. Is lobular breast cancer more genetic based than ductal?

No its medullary. a quote from Lancethttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9167459: "The occurrence of invasive lobular carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma was not significantly different between carriers of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and controls. Medullary or atypical medullary carcinoma was, however, found more often in BRCA1 (13%, p . Read more...

Mother had breast cancer at 54, her cousin had it at 47. Brca negative. Is this likely genetic?

Need more info. Brca 1;2 are not the only genes that can increase the risk for breast cancer so you cannot rule out an inherited trait. That said, they could be sporadic cancers too. I suggest you visit a specialist with expertise in risk assessment and genetics. He/she needs to do a full pedigree and get some personal info to estimate your cancer risk and decide if you (or your mom) need additional testing. Read more...

My mother had breast cancer at 54 and her cousin was diagnosed at 45. Is this likely caused by the brca gene? My insurance won't pay for it.

Possible. It is hard to say without a full family history but your relatives did have cancer at a young age. Per nccn guidelines, both are candidates for testing (assuming they are still alive). They would be the best subjects for testing and then you may or may not need to. If they can't or won't, i advise you talk to your doc to see if a genetic counselor can see you and decide on the proper testing. Read more...
BRCA. Probably not. The patient to be tested is the cousin due to age at diagnosis. You do not qualify because you're risk of having the gene is so low. That's a good thing! Read more...
Nope! If you don't have breast or ovarian cancer yourself, then you need a family history of breast cancer in two close relatives (parent, sibling, aunt, granparent, niece) on the same side of the family, or one close relative diagnosed with breast cancer before age 45. Your mother's cousin doesn't qualify as a close relative. Ask to see a genetic counselor to better define your risk. Read more...

If my mother had breast cancer at 53, does that mean that I'll get it too? My BRCA was negative and my breasts next panel (TP 53, ATM, STK11, etc.) was negative as well.

Good question. Remember we don't know all about genes and cancer (will we ever?) so as good as a negative gene panel sounds, you cannot totally rule out an inherited component. If i was counseling you, i would need a full family history and some personal information to estimate your risk as best as humanly possible and see how best to reduce your risk. It's all about odds, dear, cancer is not a certainty 4 u. Read more...
No. You have a family history, which raises your risk. If moms genetics is negative, the only way you could be (+) is if dad has gene. But, it does not mean you are not at some, elevated, risk. Read more...
No, but... You are at higher risk because of your mom. But there are things you can do to decrease your risk, including taking certain medications (tamoxifen) later if your personal risk of breast cancer is high enough. You're young, so for now stay fit, exercise, be moderate with alcohol (less than 4 drinks per week), and keep your weight down. Ask your doctor about taking tamoxifen in the future. Read more...
Good news but. That is a good news. Your work up will put you back in the general population vs high risk population, but it will not eliminate your chance of having a breast cancer. So like every woman in USA you should do self-examination monthly or bi-monthly. If you're still having your period, a yearly mammogram. and a physician examination yearly, one out of eight woman in USA will get breast cancer. Read more...

My mother had breast cancer at 54, does this mean i'll get it? Is it still more likely I won't? Brca negative.

Increased Risk. Having a mother with breast cancer doesn't mean that you will get breast cancer for sure. It does put you at increased risk of developing breast cancer. Read more...
Breast ca risk, BRCA. Your mother having breast cancer at 54 does not mean you will get it or you would have brca gene mutation. It is simply a very complicated question, and requires more information to assess. Woman’s breast cancer risk is determined by multiple factors and can be assessed by gail model through national cancer institute website. Briefly, most breast cancer occurs sporadically rather than throug. Read more...
Be cautious. The risk of breast cancer for you is there but it is not very high unless there are other first degree relatives(aunts, sisters) who have had breast cancer or ovarian cancer. 90% of the women in your situation will not get breast cancer. Yet you need to be aware of what you need to do to be on your guard and adopt preventive measures. And check your breasts for any lumps regulalrly(monthly basis). Read more...
Most likely no. Only 15% of breast cancer is related to heredity. The vast majority of breast cancer is not. So you probably have a slightly higher chance then the average woman. It depends on other factors, too, like your age when you started menstruating, number of pregnancies, etc. . Read more...