What is the prognosis with bronchogenic carcinoma and brain metastasis newly diagnosed?

Prognosis. Unfortunately to present with a new lung cancer with brain metastasis generally carries a poor prognosis with median survival generally measured in few months. Survival prediction is always difficult and has a lot to do with 'performance status', ie how well a patient is carrying on with activities of daily living. Specific cell type, size of tumor, extent of metastasis in brain and elsewhere.
Not good. In general, cancers that have distant metastasis, like to the brain have poor prognosis.

Related Questions

What is the prognosis of a 60 year old male with bronchogenic carcinoma and brain metastasis?

Cancer brain. Given that you already have metastatic spread the prognosis is not good. Knowing the exact cell type will help in determining type of treatment. Read more...
I depends. If there is a single brain lesion and the lung primary is small, surgery then possible chemo and radiation could lead to a good outcome. Unfortunately that is usually not the story. Many patients have large lung tumors and several brain lesions. In that case we try to palliate symptoms and get some survival improvement, but that is often measured in months. Read more...

What can be done for someone with stage 4 her2 cancer with brain metastasis?

There is Treatment. For HER2 positive breast Cancer, there are some good treatments available. Ask your medical Oncologist and let us know what treatments have been offered or done already. Radiotherapy to brain is one good solution to controlling the brain metastases, in addition to chemotherapy and Herceptin (trastuzumab) which is a good drug. Give us some more details. Read more...
Guarded results. One approaches stage IV breast Ca with targeted therapy. With HER2/neu + cancer,, radiation and at times high intensity US given to brain followed by Herceptin( trastuzumab), Perjeta (pertuzumab) Kadcyla ( T-DM1), and Tykerb ( lapatinib). Brain lesion produces most risk . While half of HER2+ will develop brain mets, there are in general no long term survivors. Read more...

How can a radiologist tell whether lesions on the brain are from a demyelinating process (ex. MS) or brain metastasis from an unknown cancer??

Usually evident. Radiologists are trained to interpret various lesion patterns on films, and each disorder has characteristic features. The classical MS lesion is periventricular, and perpendicular to the ventricle (Dawson's fingers). The typical metastasis is isolated toward the grey-white junction & likely surrounded by edema. A tough call is tumefactive MS which can be confusing. Read more...