7 doctors weighed in:
Are there racial disparities in regards to gonorrhea?
7 doctors weighed in

Dr. Francine Yep
Family Medicine
4 doctors agree
In brief: Yes. Huge.
Great question. In 2010, rate of gonorrhea [gc] was 17-18 times higher for blacks than whites.
American indians/alaska natives 5 times more than whites. Asians/pacific islanders 15 times less than whites. Hispanics 2 times more than whites. What to do about these differences [outreach, health care access] is an even bigger, critical question.

In brief: Yes. Huge.
Great question. In 2010, rate of gonorrhea [gc] was 17-18 times higher for blacks than whites.
American indians/alaska natives 5 times more than whites. Asians/pacific islanders 15 times less than whites. Hispanics 2 times more than whites. What to do about these differences [outreach, health care access] is an even bigger, critical question.
Dr. Francine Yep
Dr. Francine Yep
Thank
Dr. Simon Kimm
Urology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Unfortuately, yes.
Although rates of gonorrhea infections in the U.
S. Have declined, significant racial, gender, and regional disparities remain, and in some cases, are worsening. In 2003, the reported rates among african americans were 655.8 vs. 32.7 cases in caucasians per 100, 000 population. In 2003, rates among african americans were 20 times higher than whites. In 1981, it was 11 times higher.

In brief: Unfortuately, yes.
Although rates of gonorrhea infections in the U.
S. Have declined, significant racial, gender, and regional disparities remain, and in some cases, are worsening. In 2003, the reported rates among african americans were 655.8 vs. 32.7 cases in caucasians per 100, 000 population. In 2003, rates among african americans were 20 times higher than whites. In 1981, it was 11 times higher.
Dr. Simon Kimm
Dr. Simon Kimm
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Simon Kimm
The causes of these racial disparities are complex and not well understood. Differences in health services access and utilization, socioeconomic and geographic clustering of populations, and differences in reporting by public and private health care providers are likely contributors.
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