Is a lumpectomy for breast cancer done with a local or general anesthesia?

Anesthsia. In my practice, I use a heavy sedation (also known as mac) with local or general anesthesia. It depends on how extensive the mass and if i need to do a procedure on the lymph nodes. With proper pre operative physical exam, the risk for anesthesia can be assessed and the appropriate method can be selected. It is important to be comfortable so the surgeon can complete the procedure safely.
Depends on pt. Lumpectomy alone is fine under local with sedation added. Pts usually fall asleep but don't need to be "put" to sleep with breathing tube & paralysis. When sentinel node bx is added, we usually opt for general (intubated or laryngeal mask if anesth will do it) since it's longer and the axilla & behind the muscle is harder to access & numb. Regional block is feasible but rarely offered by anesth.
Either or both. Most often, the surgeon will inject some local anesthesia and the anesthesiologist will give some sedation as well. Sometimes general anesthesia is needed due to the specific health problems of the patient, or the location of the tumor. A tumor deep within a breast requires more anesthesia than one that is close to the skin. Talk to the anesthesiologist and surgeon about the options.
Twilight. I perform lumpectomies under local anesthesia supplemented by IV sedation ("twilight" anesthesia). When performing lumpectomies for breast cancer, i usually will perform a sentinel lymph node biopsy at the same time. Depending on the patient, this is commonly performed under twilight or general anesthesia. Regardless, this is out-patient surgery with a very short recovery time.
Usually sedation. This is usually done under local anesthesia with IV sedation. If there is going to be a lymph node dissection as well then the anesthetic may be increased to a general.

Related Questions

I'm a 49 year old, chinese, menopausal woman. I got a lumpectomy done for a dcis interme grade. It was noninvasive. I have completed 6 weeks of radiation therapy. I have no previous history of breast cancer. Is tamoxifenrequired?

Yes and no. If your dcis was estrogen receptor positive, 5 years of tamoxifen is an acceptable (but not obligatory) option. It's main effect, though, will be to reduce the odds of getting another cancer in the opposite breast. You need to discuss this well with your med onc and be sure that potential toxicity does not outweigh potential benefits. Hope you get good news every time you visit your doc. Read more...
Not required but. It is an option. It can help reduce the chance of the dcis coming back, as well as the risk of a new, second cancer in the future. But these risks are low and tamoxifen has its own risks and side effects. You should discuss the pros and cons with a medical oncologist. Read more...

I had a lumpectomy for breast cancer and also had chemotherapy as it was grade 3. Now, the doctors want me to have radiations and take tamoxifen, but I'm fed up with the treatment. What should I do?

Keep going. Congrats for finishing chemo! please do not stop now. If you had a lumpectomy, then you need to get radiation to help decrease your chance of the cancer coming back in the lumpectony area. If you skip rad, you recurrence rate is 30%. If you do not want to get the rad, then you should get a mastectomy. The rad is not as bad as chemo and only takes 7-8 weeks. Good luck! Read more...
Don't stop now! The purpose of all the treatment is to reduce your risk of recurrence. You are fortunate to have a chance at cure. If it recurs it is deadly. The hardest part is behind you (chemotherapy) yet the most important treatment , that lowers your risk the most, is what's left. Talk to your doctors and counselors! good luck. Read more...
Half way. You are half way done, need radiation after lumpectomy for sure. If cancer was estrogen/ Progesterone receptors (er/pr) positive, you need tamoxifen for added protection to block it from coming back! Read more...
Keep it up. You must feel understandably tired and worn out after chemo but, since you had a lumpectomy (and i assume your cancer was er+) it would be unwise not to complete the recommended treatment. Don't be overwhelmed by this. Take it one day at a time. Read more...

I had lumpectomy for breast cancer then had to have chemo now drs want me to have radiotherapy I don't want to have anymore treatment should i?

Need radiation tx. As a patient you have the right to refuse any therapy as long as you are aware of the consequencies of your decision. Now, radiation therapy will be needed if you only had a lumpectomy- to reduce your recurrence risk to the same breast. That is for your own benefit. You are young which means your risk for cancer recurrence will be quite significant- so you want to reduce it as much as possible. Read more...
YES!!! After lumpectomy radiation plays a key role in decreasing the risk of local recurrence in the breast after lumpectomy. This is a seperate effect than that of chemotherapy. Without radiation your local recurrence could be 3-4 times higher. If you fail locally because of foregoing radiation, this may put you at risk for metastatic disease as well. Please talk to your oncologist and finish treatment. Read more...
You should. Discuss your concerns with your radiation oncologist. Not have the radiation will increase the chances the cancer will come back. Read more...

Can or should I continue laser txt for face wrinkles while healing from lumpectomy for breast cancer? One laser txt prior to diag. During radiation?

Continue. Healing from a lumpectomy should not interfere with any additional treatments iff the lesion is dcis and further surgery like axillary dissection suggested. If nothing further is offered for the breast then laser treatment of face should be permitted. Read more...
It's fine. The radiation you will be receiving for your breast cancer is in a different place from your facial laser treatment, so it shouldn't matter. Read more...

How often to breast cancer patients have a lumpectomy & gone on to live a life, cancer free?

Much more often.... ...Than not. Thankfully, our tools for treating breast cancer have improved quite a bit over the past 20 years. Survival is not related to method of surgical rx (lumpectomy vs. Mastectomy); rather, it is dependent on the stage, type, and molecular features of the cancer. When caught very early, the chance for cure is better-than 90%. The best way to do that is yearly mammograms beginning at 40. Read more...
Most of the time. Every breast cancer is different, however if a lumpectomy done for an early stage cancer, typically followed by breast radiation, the prognosis is generally good and most patients will go on to live a normal healthy life. Read more...

I thought I had breast cancer, after my lumpectomy we found out they were benign. Am I a cancer survivor?

Not exactly. You have a benign breast condition such as fibrocystic condition. You have a non-cancerous condition. You have not had breast cancer and not a "cancer survivor.". Read more...

After lumpectomy what are the best measures to practice to prevent one from having a lump or breast cancer.

Self exams . Md exams mammograms annually depending on age. Read more...
Adjuvant treatment. For most breast cancers, after a lumpectomy adjuvant breast radiation is required to maximize local control and cure. If the tumor was more than 1cm depending on some other features, chemotherapy could be reccomended( often determined by molecular testing with oncotype dx). If the cells were hormone receptor positive then a hormone blocking pill can further decrease recurrence rates).Ask team. Read more...

Been diagnosed with breast cancer, for which lumpectomy & radiation suggested. I have pmle. Will this be a problem when it comes to radiation?

Oncologist . Your oncologist will guide your through every step. Read more...
Gamma not same as UV. Gamma radiation is not the same as uv radiation but it is best to discuss with your radiation oncologist. Read more...
PMLE appears . To be immune mediated. I know of no reports of reactions with megavoltage energy radiotherapy that would be advised for breast conservation. The size of the lesion, nodes, er/pr/her-2-neu status would help. Ordinarliy I am *not* an advocate of "partial breast rt", you might discuss this with your radiation oncology consultant. Read more...