Can a chlamydia infection during pregnancy harm the unborn child?

Passes at delivery. Untreated chlamydia does not appear to cause birth defects or major infection like syphillis. However, it can pass to the baby during delivery and set up various problems. The baby may develop a significant infection of the surface and outer structures of the eye (which can be treated). It may lie dormant for a few weeks and show up as a pneumonia in baby at 4-6 wks requiring hospital care.

Related Questions

In which condition a pregnant woman can pass chlamydia infection to her unborn child even in caesar case?

Ruptured membranes. Chlamydia passes by direct contact, so if your bag of waters broke before you went into labor or the amniotic sac actually got infected by the bacteria (less common), then the infection could be transmitted to the baby even with a c-section delivery. Best to get the chlamydia treated, document cure, and treat partners to prevent re-infection. Read more...

I'm taking doxycycline for a possible chlamydia infection, will it still be effective if I drink alcohol during the one-week regimen?

If you are not. Drinking continuously....(whole new set of problems), and only have an occasional drink not within two hours of the medication it should still be effective. Read more...
Not as effective. Alcohol can decrease the effectiveness of the antibiotic. With Doxycycline no milk or dairy within 2 hours of taking it because it definitely affects the absorption of the doxycycline. Read more...

Do women usually have successful pregnancies after a chlamydia infection or do you always become infertile if not treated for a long time?

SOME DO. Chlamydia may enter the female genital tract and cause injury & scaring to the sensitive fallopian tubes or worse. If an infection is detected prior to damage & treated effectively, the problems can be minimized and natural pregnancy can occur. With todays tech a willing couple can harvest eggs, fertalize & implant embryos, bypassing the tubes. Expensive but possible. Read more...