3 doctors weighed in:

Had c setion in my 1st born 5 years ago, i want to have a normal delivery this time but my ob told me that will still undergo c-section. Is that true?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeff Livingston
Obstetrics & Gynecology
2 doctors agree

In brief: VBAC

Some people are candidates for a vaginal delivery after c section (vbac).
You can ask if you are a candidate. You can also ask if your doctor attends to these type of deliveries. Because of the elevated risk of uterine rupture many doctors choose not to offer this service. If you are a candidate and choose to accept the risk you may need to find a doctor who offers this service.

In brief: VBAC

Some people are candidates for a vaginal delivery after c section (vbac).
You can ask if you are a candidate. You can also ask if your doctor attends to these type of deliveries. Because of the elevated risk of uterine rupture many doctors choose not to offer this service. If you are a candidate and choose to accept the risk you may need to find a doctor who offers this service.
Thank
Dr. Gabriel Betancourt
Family Medicine

In brief: Yes and no.

What you want to have done is called a vbac - vaginal birth after cesarean.
It can be done, but it involves a lot more risk. One of the risks associated with vbacs is the possibility of uterine rupture during the delivery. To avoid this potentially serious complication, most obs strongly encourage their patients to have another c-section. Most obs are not willing to perform vbacs, but some do.

In brief: Yes and no.

What you want to have done is called a vbac - vaginal birth after cesarean.
It can be done, but it involves a lot more risk. One of the risks associated with vbacs is the possibility of uterine rupture during the delivery. To avoid this potentially serious complication, most obs strongly encourage their patients to have another c-section. Most obs are not willing to perform vbacs, but some do.
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