9 doctors weighed in:

I have a family history of breast cancer and would like to know when my mammograms should start?

9 doctors weighed in
5 doctors agree

In brief: Earlier than 40

It depends- how strong a family history, if other family members have been tested positive for the brca 1 or 2 gene mutations help guide when screening mammograms should start, or for considering genetic counseling.

In brief: Earlier than 40

It depends- how strong a family history, if other family members have been tested positive for the brca 1 or 2 gene mutations help guide when screening mammograms should start, or for considering genetic counseling.
Dr. Lee Pederson
Dr. Lee Pederson
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1 comment
Dr. Barry Rosen
In general, I recommend getting a mammogram 10 years earlier than when your youngest (1st-degree) relative with breast cancer was diagnosed. For women in their 20's or 30's at high-risk, an MRI is a much more sensitive test than a mammogram for breast cancer screening (although much more expensive).
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Pathology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Age 40 is usual

The recommended age for start of mammography screening is 40 years.
You should discuss your family history with your doctor to see if variation from the recommended practice is warranted.

In brief: Age 40 is usual

The recommended age for start of mammography screening is 40 years.
You should discuss your family history with your doctor to see if variation from the recommended practice is warranted.
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
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Dr. Joseph Woods
Pathology

In brief: Probably at 50.

Starting mammograms at 50 has been shown to save lives.
There has been debate to start at 40, but the fact that the disease does not show up much before 50, mammograms don't often detect cancer before 50, and that no clinical study has proven this to save lives if started at 40 has, so far, kept the age at 50. Many still think 40 should be the starting point.

In brief: Probably at 50.

Starting mammograms at 50 has been shown to save lives.
There has been debate to start at 40, but the fact that the disease does not show up much before 50, mammograms don't often detect cancer before 50, and that no clinical study has proven this to save lives if started at 40 has, so far, kept the age at 50. Many still think 40 should be the starting point.
Dr. Joseph Woods
Dr. Joseph Woods
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