6 doctors weighed in:

Are there ways that hospitals can lessen the chance of sepsis after surgery?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. William Walsh
Addiction Medicine
3 doctors agree

In brief: Yes and..

They should be using them routinely (hand washing, removing unnecessary ivs/central lines, removing foley catheters, protecting against bed sores, thorough preparation of the surgical site and good wound care afterwards, preoperative antibiotics).
Operative site infections still happen, but are much less common over the past decade.

In brief: Yes and..

They should be using them routinely (hand washing, removing unnecessary ivs/central lines, removing foley catheters, protecting against bed sores, thorough preparation of the surgical site and good wound care afterwards, preoperative antibiotics).
Operative site infections still happen, but are much less common over the past decade.
Dr. William Walsh
Dr. William Walsh
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1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes but

1st of all, sepsis after elective surgery is rare.
Hospitals are always under pressure to improve outcome lest payment be withheld. However, hospitals cannot turn away patients. If you have to operate on septic patients (perforated appendix, ulcer, diverticulitis, or other peritonitis...), sepsis after surgery is expected.

In brief: Yes but

1st of all, sepsis after elective surgery is rare.
Hospitals are always under pressure to improve outcome lest payment be withheld. However, hospitals cannot turn away patients. If you have to operate on septic patients (perforated appendix, ulcer, diverticulitis, or other peritonitis...), sepsis after surgery is expected.
Dr. George T Tsai
Dr. George T Tsai
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