5 doctors weighed in:
Why are bacteria in hospitals often more resistant to antibiotics and more likely to cause sepsis?
5 doctors weighed in

Dr. Carlo Hatem
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care
2 doctors agree
In brief: Selection/evolution
People bring all kind of bacteria to the hospital.
Powerful antibiotics are used, so only resistant bacteria survive and lurk around. Once they find a victim, they jump in. Furthermore, people in a hospital have in general a weaker immune system.

In brief: Selection/evolution
People bring all kind of bacteria to the hospital.
Powerful antibiotics are used, so only resistant bacteria survive and lurk around. Once they find a victim, they jump in. Furthermore, people in a hospital have in general a weaker immune system.
Dr. Carlo Hatem
Dr. Carlo Hatem
Thank
Dr. David Wishnew
Wound care
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Antibiotics
Patients in the hospital are generally sicker than those who are not hospitalized.
Often, they bring in with them more resistant strains of bacteria as well as more exotic and dangerous strains of bacteria. This great concentration of pathogens are capable of having emerging resistance to the more common antibiotics. This, in turn, leads to more serious infections (i.e. Sepsis).

In brief: Antibiotics
Patients in the hospital are generally sicker than those who are not hospitalized.
Often, they bring in with them more resistant strains of bacteria as well as more exotic and dangerous strains of bacteria. This great concentration of pathogens are capable of having emerging resistance to the more common antibiotics. This, in turn, leads to more serious infections (i.e. Sepsis).
Dr. David Wishnew
Dr. David Wishnew
Thank
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