8 doctors weighed in:

If a sacral dimple is closed and is just a skin dimple, does this mean the child has a neural tube defect underneath?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Fisher
Dermatology
4 doctors agree

In brief: Sacral dimple

Most of the time, sacral dimples are harmless and don't require any treatment.
Rarely, a sacral dimple may indicate a serious underlying abnormality of the spine or spinal cord. To rule out any abnormality, your child's doctor may recommend an imaging test. If an abnormality is discovered, treatment depends on the underlying cause.

In brief: Sacral dimple

Most of the time, sacral dimples are harmless and don't require any treatment.
Rarely, a sacral dimple may indicate a serious underlying abnormality of the spine or spinal cord. To rule out any abnormality, your child's doctor may recommend an imaging test. If an abnormality is discovered, treatment depends on the underlying cause.
Dr. Michael Fisher
Dr. Michael Fisher
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1 doctor agrees

In brief: No!

Minor shallow sacral dimples have no complications.
They are a normal variation. Deeper pits or sinuses can become infected, usually when a child is much older. Further testing is only needed when dimples are large, deep and are unusual in location or appearance. Sacral dimples are found in 3% of normal babies.

In brief: No!

Minor shallow sacral dimples have no complications.
They are a normal variation. Deeper pits or sinuses can become infected, usually when a child is much older. Further testing is only needed when dimples are large, deep and are unusual in location or appearance. Sacral dimples are found in 3% of normal babies.
Dr. Michael H. T. Sia
Dr. Michael H. T. Sia
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Dr. Stephen Kim
Surgery - Pediatric

In brief: Maybe

A sacral dimple may be benign, but in newborns and infants, it may be associated with an underlying neural tube defect.
In the newborn period, an ultrasound would be the standard imaging study. For older children, MRI may be indicated.

In brief: Maybe

A sacral dimple may be benign, but in newborns and infants, it may be associated with an underlying neural tube defect.
In the newborn period, an ultrasound would be the standard imaging study. For older children, MRI may be indicated.
Dr. Stephen Kim
Dr. Stephen Kim
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