Is pregnancy gingivitis different from regular gingivitis?

See below. Pregnancy gingivitis is believed to be secondary to hormonal changes during pregnancy. Regular is not.
Yes. Pregnancy gingivitis is caused by the multitude of hormonal changes that occur during pregnancy. You must maintain impeccable oral hygiene during pregnancy and afterwards. I have a lot of patients use multiple pregnancies as an excuse for tooth loss and dentures. I think this tooth decay is most likely due to less emphasis on oral hygiene due to the stress of pregnancy and child rearing.
Yes. Can be similar symptoms between the two, but with pregnancy related gum problems it can be traced to the changes in hormone levels. And some will develop quite large "pregnancy tumors" or one area of a really swollen gum. See the dentist and keep up good oral care habits.

Related Questions

Is the treatment for pregnancy gingivitis different than for nonpregnant gingivitis?

NO. Co-enzyme q 10 deficiency causes gingivitis and indicates normal metabolic decline in old people. This is because this substance is known to be a "conditional nutrient". It is synthesized in the body by younger people and it is abundantly clear that poor diet is responsible in pregnancy. A supplement of coq10 will clear your gingivitis, but look at your diet! Read more...
Yes. Due to the large changes in hormones during pregnancy, gingivitis is not thought of as a constant but is watched for undo changes. Proper hygiene should be maintained in both conditions, or achieved for constancy in expected results. In a more stable condition outside of pregnancy, hopefully before pregnancy, a good hygiene should have already been established to know that maintenance is present. Read more...

What are your best home remedies for pregnancy gingivitis?

Pregnancy gingivitis. Be as diligent as you can with proper tooth brushing and flossing. When was your last professional dental exam and cleaning? Start there and have your own dentist or dental hygienist go over proper oral hygiene techniques with you. Read more...
Good Oral Hygiene. and visit your dentist to help with pregnancy gingivitis by removing plaque and bacteria, which in turn can control gum inflammation. Congratulations! Read more...

What is the definition or description of: pregnancy gingivitis?

Very similar. Pregnancy gingivitis has the same characteristics of regular gingivitis with the exception that pregnancy can be a contributing factor with the onset of the release of steroid hormones involved in the pregnancy cycle. The collection of hormones in the gingival crevicular fluid helps any existing inflammation become that much more. Just remember to have good oral care during pregnancy! Read more...
Gums Bleed? During pregnancy, the hormonal levels are preparing body for developing fetus. The gums are affected by this hormone change and become susceptible to inflammation. The inflammed gingiva will appear puffy, red, sometimes sore, and will bleed readily. This is pregnancy gingivitis which requires good oral hygiene and dental cleanings to keep it in check. Read more...
Bleeding gums. Pregnancy gingivitis is inflammation of the gingival tissue in the mouth caused by hormonal changes during pregnancy. Regular dental cleanings will help this condition. Read more...
Pyogenic Granuloma. When pregnancy occurs hormonal changes happen. You my notice that your gums can get red, swollen and bleed. Cleanings are an important part of your pregnancy. Get a release and clearance from your obgyn to your dentist for a cleaning. The second trimester is usually the safest time. Remember to keep up with brushing and flossing your teeth. Read more...
Hormonal-caused. Hormonal changes during pregnancy can cause the gums to swell, redden, become sore and bleed easily. The hormonal changes also interfere with the body's normal response to the bacteria in the mouth which causes gum infections. Brushing at least twice daily and flossing at least once a day can help as well as regular visits to the dentist for cleanings at least twice a year. Read more...
Gum inflammation. Puffy, red, bleeding gums caused by hormonal changes in pregnant women. Sometimes pregnant women are negligent in their home care and dental cleanings exacerbating the problem. Read more...

This is my first trimester and I have been diagnosed with pregnancy gingivitis. My coverage only covers 1 cleaning a year, what should I do?

Go twice a year. pay second one to reduce the immflamation. Read more...
BrushWell,GetAnother. cleaning, shop around, ask friends about both price & quality. Public has been long deluded about "insurance". It insures nothing: only collect money & make sure much never given back, drive costs up; quality, efficacy, access to service all down. Why would paying for something through a 3rd money party make things less expensive? It does not, an advance time-payment plan & charged $ to save. Read more...
Home Care & Cleaning. Perfect your home care -- electric brush and waterpik. Get a 2nd cleaning, but request no examination from the DR. -- this will save you about $45. If you can afford the exam as well, then even better. Ask for a shower gift of a gift certificate for a cleaning at your Dentist's office. Good Luck with all. Read more...