What's the difference between your central and peripheral nervous system?

Just that. The division of your nervous system into central & peripheral is based on anatomy, not physiology. . The brain & spinal cord make up the central; the continuation from these two make up the peripheral. But they are continuous. The ''third" nervous system regulates the function of your remaining organ systems, from bowel to cardiovascular & everything in between. Maintains balance.

Related Questions

What is the difference between the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system?

Anatomical terms. Brain, spinal cord, and cranial nerves, especially optic nerves, all start within the central system. Once outside the spinal canal these nerves are now called peripheral nerves and connect to muscle to cause contraction, and return to spinal cord, sensory nerves, to report peripheral sensations from outer world. Read more...

How does the peripheral nervous system connect to the centeral nervous system and vice versa?

Through spinal nerve. Most peripheral nerves connect to the CNS via the spinal cord. Some through autonomic chains. Read more...

Can you tell me examples for central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, somatic nervous system?

OK. Central nervous system - brain & spinal cord Peripheral nervous system - all the nerves that come out from the brain and spinal cord. Within the peripheral nervous system you have 'somatic' and 'visceral' nervous systems. Somatic refers to muscle, skeleton, skin. Visceral refers to internal organs. In a nutshell! Read more...

Is it the central or peripheral nervous system problem if you get back pain with sensations going down a leg?

Back. Peripheral in spinal nerves from vertebrae in lower back. Pain sensation is modulated at central level. Read more...
Describing sciatica. Peripheral nerve compression.As the nerves leave the spinal column the "disc", a tough, fibrous, shock absorber that is between the vertebral bones can extrude and press on the nerve in a few places.This is usually "self-limited" meaning it goes away over time with stretching, nsaid's like ibuprofen, and traction(gravity boots).Usually no images(x-ray, ct, mri) needed unless weakness, bladder, bowel, chang. Read more...