5 doctors weighed in:

How common is sepsis with ecthyma gangrenosum?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. William Walsh
Addiction Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: Very rare

I have never taken care of a patient with this despite working in an ICU for 7 years at a major referral center. There not even any case series published - just case reports, indicating that no one has been able to even accumulate enough cases at one institution to document more than a few.

In brief: Very rare

I have never taken care of a patient with this despite working in an ICU for 7 years at a major referral center. There not even any case series published - just case reports, indicating that no one has been able to even accumulate enough cases at one institution to document more than a few.
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Dr. Michael Ein
Internal Medicine - Infectious Disease

In brief: Not very

Ecthyma gangrenosum is characteristic of pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis but can be caused by a variety of other bacteria.
It is reported to occur in 1.3%-2.8% of septic patients. I have seen it usually in immune suppressed, agranulocytic cancer patients.

In brief: Not very

Ecthyma gangrenosum is characteristic of pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis but can be caused by a variety of other bacteria.
It is reported to occur in 1.3%-2.8% of septic patients. I have seen it usually in immune suppressed, agranulocytic cancer patients.
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Dr. Martin Raff
Internal Medicine - Infectious Disease

In brief: About 100%

Ecthyma gangrenosum is a skin lesion which occurs during sepsis with gram-negative bacilli, most often pseudomonas aeruginosa, but has been documented with several other pathogens.
Sepsis is the cause, the skin lesion is the result.

In brief: About 100%

Ecthyma gangrenosum is a skin lesion which occurs during sepsis with gram-negative bacilli, most often pseudomonas aeruginosa, but has been documented with several other pathogens.
Sepsis is the cause, the skin lesion is the result.
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