Can antiviral medications increase the chance of secondary bacterial infections and sepsis?

No. Unless you have a rare side effect and have suppression of your bone marrow and can not generate enough infection fighting cells.
Yes and no. Viral infection can exhaust your immune system and make you more susceptible to bacterial infections including sepsis. It is not the medications usually.

Related Questions

Can antifungal medications increase the chance of secondary bacterial infections and sepsis?

Unlikely. Fungal infections usually occur in immunocompromised people who are already at risk for bacterial infection.
Yes and no. Fungal infection can exhaust your immune system and make you more susceptible to bacterial infections including sepsis. It is not the medications usually, though antifungals can be quite toxic including suppressing the bone marrow that produces blood cells to fight infection.

How common are secondary bacterial infections or sepsis with a mono infection?

Not quantified. Secondary bacterial infections are common enough to make most of the lists of complications of ebv that leads to infectious mononucleosis, but I could not find that a case rate had been published at this time (i.e. A percentage of cases that develop secondary infections). The illness does cause relative immune compromise through splenic inflammation and neutropenia in some cases.

In what way does antiviral medication lead to bacterial infections?

Not usual antivirals. Common antiviral medications such as Zovirax or Valtrex (valacyclovir) used to treat herpes viruses, or Tamiflu used to treat influenza viruses, do not lead to bacterial infections. Certain medications that suppress a person's immune system, such as prednisone, are sometimes used to decrease inflammation caused by some viral infections. With immunosuppressant meds, a person may get other infections more easily.
They do not. Antiviral drugs do not cause or lead to bacterial infections.

Can good hygiene prevent the possibility of bacterial infection and sepsis?

Risk reduction. You reduce your risk of infection, and thus for complications for infection, by practicing good hand hygiene, getting vaccinated, eating well, and avoiding excess alcohol and smoking anything at all. It is never possible to prevent (absolutely) the possibility of severe infection.
Sepsis. Maintaining good hygiene will certainly help prevent infection and sepsis - but it is not the only factor for developing sepsis.

I have a bacterial infection, can this become blood poisoning?

Yes. Depending where the bacterial infection originates and if allowed to go unchecked --> it can spread to the local tissue, into the blood and even into the bone. You should get a physician evaluate your infection if you are concerned.
Yes. Most bacterial infections don't cause sepsis, but untreated, ignored, or especially potent infections can lead to sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock and death. Treat infections seriously.