13 doctors weighed in:
What are the treatments for invasive ductal carcinoma in situ?
13 doctors weighed in

Dr. Barry Rosen
Surgery
9 doctors agree
In brief: INVASIVE or DCIS?
These terms are incongruous: dcis is, by definition, breast cancer that has not "broken out" of the ducts and entered the adjacent supportive tissue of the breast; invasive, or infiltrating ductal cancer, by definition, has.
The treatment of these 2 diseases is quite different since there is a risk of systemic disease with the latter. Please clarify, thanks.

In brief: INVASIVE or DCIS?
These terms are incongruous: dcis is, by definition, breast cancer that has not "broken out" of the ducts and entered the adjacent supportive tissue of the breast; invasive, or infiltrating ductal cancer, by definition, has.
The treatment of these 2 diseases is quite different since there is a risk of systemic disease with the latter. Please clarify, thanks.
Dr. Barry Rosen
Dr. Barry Rosen
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Sean Canale
I agree with the need to differentiate between invasive and in situ cancer. The local therapy options however are generally the same (breast conservation versus mastectomy). Invasive cancer however required additional attention focused on systemic issues. In situ disease by definition has not yet developed the potential to spread/metastasize.
Dr. Lawrence Hochman
Radiation Oncology
4 doctors agree
In brief: No good answer here!
Invasive ductal carcinoma, and ductal carcinoma in situ are not the same thing.
They are often treated in similar fashion, with surgery and radiation. But without a clear understanding of what you are describing there is unfortunately no good answer here.

In brief: No good answer here!
Invasive ductal carcinoma, and ductal carcinoma in situ are not the same thing.
They are often treated in similar fashion, with surgery and radiation. But without a clear understanding of what you are describing there is unfortunately no good answer here.
Dr. Lawrence Hochman
Dr. Lawrence Hochman
Thank
4 doctors agree
In brief: Surgery
The extent of the disease, that is how big it looks, on the mammogram or MRI will be a big factor in discussion with your surgeon about how best to treat this tumor. If small, then many women prefer lumpectomy (removal of the dcis and a clean margin of breast tissue) and radiation.
If the area is large, then mastectomy with or without reconstruction is usually preferred.

In brief: Surgery
The extent of the disease, that is how big it looks, on the mammogram or MRI will be a big factor in discussion with your surgeon about how best to treat this tumor. If small, then many women prefer lumpectomy (removal of the dcis and a clean margin of breast tissue) and radiation.
If the area is large, then mastectomy with or without reconstruction is usually preferred.
Dr. Lee Pederson
Dr. Lee Pederson
Thank
Dr. Sean Canale
Breast Surgery
2 doctors agree
In brief: Invasive or in situ?
One needs to differentiate between invasive and in situ cancer.
The local therapy options are generally the same (breast conservation versus mastectomy). Invasive cancer however requires additional attention focused on systemic issues. In situ disease by definition has not yet developed the potential to spread/metastasize.

In brief: Invasive or in situ?
One needs to differentiate between invasive and in situ cancer.
The local therapy options are generally the same (breast conservation versus mastectomy). Invasive cancer however requires additional attention focused on systemic issues. In situ disease by definition has not yet developed the potential to spread/metastasize.
Dr. Sean Canale
Dr. Sean Canale
Thank
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