I have breast cancer, is it more likely that a bacterial infection become septic?

Chemo? yes. If you are currently undergoing chemotherapy, this is a possibility. Chemo kills cancer cells but also weakens the immune system, which protects us from germs and bacterial infections. Be sure to keep track of your surroundings take take precautions to not expose yourself to others that are sick.
No. There is nothing unique about breast cancer that would make you more prone to sepsis. Hoiwever, chemotherapy does temporarily affect your response to infection; if you are receiving chemotherapy at present, the answer would be "yes".

Related Questions

Does having radiation for my breast cancer make me more likely to get an infection?

In some ways. During radiation therapy, your skin is more fragile and may develop blisters. When skin is broken like this, it is easier for bacteria to cause infection. After radiation therapy, the lymphatic vessels in your breast tissue may be altered. This can increase your risk of developing an infection in your breast, armpit or arm. Read more...
No. Radiation to the breast will have little to no effect on the immune system as very little bone marrow is exposed. You have little higher risk of getting the flu or other infection. That said in unusual and rare cases I have seen mastitis which is an infection treated by antibiotics. Read more...
Varies. In the post-operative period you are at risk of having infections in your wounds. Long-term the radiation will not increase your risk of infection. Read more...

I discovered lump in my breast. Dr. Told me that its infection. I am very worried that it was breast cancer. How do I distinguish?

Time. A lump in the breast is very concerning for a women. We know that breast cancer occurs in 1 in 11 women in the us. Monthly breast exams help you follow your body. An infection should get better with treatment. If it persists then your doctor may then want to do more testing. An infection should have redness and pain. It should improve with treatment over weeks. In a month see doctor again. Read more...
Ask your doctor. Ask your doctor and review your test results. I assume that you have had a mammogram and possibly breast ultrasound. Generally there would be a physical examination difference that your doctor would recognize. Antibiotics will resolve a breast infection, and a breast cancer would not respond to antibiotics. A breast lump that does not go away would also be something that requires re-evaluation. Read more...

What are the differences between a nipple infection and breast cancer?

Unclear question. Infection is due usually to bacteria. Cancer is a disorder of cell growth. If you have any concern about having either, please see your doctor as an examination is need to tell the difference. Read more...

What are the signs of male breast cancer or infection?

See below. Breast cancer in men is rare, usually occurs over age 60, and is usually a painless firm mass under the nipple. Breast infection is also uncommon in males & would be a swollen, red, painful lump. Gynecomastia is a painful firm lump under the nipple in men & more common. Need to see a doctor for an examination to help you differentiate these. Read more...
They are generally. the same signs as females have. For cancer, a lump. For infection, pain, redness, swelling, and maybe a lump. Read more...

What can cause swelling below the areola (besides inflammatory breast cancer)? No redness, pain, etc. Swollen nodes, but have been battling an infection.

Subalveolar abscess. An abscess in subalveolar region needs to be ruled out first, especially with a history of infection and swollen nodes. Pl see attached link on the subject. Read more...
Fibrocystic changes. Swelling below the areoal is ususally from benign causes. Inflammatory breast carcinoma is a lesion of the subcutaneous lymphatics of breast infiltrated with Ca. The breast becomes swollen and erytenatous with the edges of the lesion elevated. A 3D mammo or MRI of breast can resolve the issue. Bx is necessary to RO inflammatory Ca which can be lethal. Read more...