Can good hygiene prevent the possibility of bacterial infection and sepsis?

Risk reduction. You reduce your risk of infection, and thus for complications for infection, by practicing good hand hygiene, getting vaccinated, eating well, and avoiding excess alcohol and smoking anything at all. It is never possible to prevent (absolutely) the possibility of severe infection.
Sepsis. Maintaining good hygiene will certainly help prevent infection and sepsis - but it is not the only factor for developing sepsis.

Related Questions

Is cleaning your vagina with washcloth an water after sex a good way to prevent bacterial infections after skin to skin contact from sex?

Not really... Immediately after sex, urinate and wipe from front to back. The only real infection you need to worry about after sex is a bladder infection. As for other skin bacterial infections, i guess you could take a shower using warm water and soap as usual. Read more...
Squeaky Clean. Don't go overboard on cleaning your vagina. Don't use regular soap inside the vagina. http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/vagina-health/Pages/keep-vagina-clean.aspx. Read more...

How common are secondary bacterial infections or sepsis with a mono infection?

Not quantified. Secondary bacterial infections are common enough to make most of the lists of complications of ebv that leads to infectious mononucleosis, but i could not find that a case rate had been published at this time (i.e. A percentage of cases that develop secondary infections). The illness does cause relative immune compromise through splenic inflammation and neutropenia in some cases. Read more...

Can antiviral medications increase the chance of secondary bacterial infections and sepsis?

No. Unless you have a rare side effect and have suppression of your bone marrow and can not generate enough infection fighting cells. Read more...
Yes and no. Viral infection can exhaust your immune system and make you more susceptible to bacterial infections including sepsis. It is not the medications usually. Read more...

I have a bacterial infection, can this become blood poisoning?

Yes. Depending where the bacterial infection originates and if allowed to go unchecked --> it can spread to the local tissue, into the blood and even into the bone. You should get a physician evaluate your infection if you are concerned. Read more...
Yes. Most bacterial infections don't cause sepsis, but untreated, ignored, or especially potent infections can lead to sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock and death. Treat infections seriously. Read more...

How I prevent bacterial infections caused by my child in putting his dirty fingers in his mouth?

Normal kid behavior. Kids often put their fingers into their mouths. That is normal behavior for children. The best that parents can do is to keep the children's environment fairly clean, and avoid places with obvious disease risks. A parent cannot constantly follow a child around and watch the child's hands, but giving the child gentle instructions every now and then is fine to do. Read more...
See below. Talk with him about good hygiene practices. And demonstrate good hygiene products. Read more...
Wash hands often. Teach your child to wash his hands frequently. Every time after going to the bathroom, before eating, after playing outside or with a pet, whenever they appear dirty. Encourage him not to put the fingers in his mouth. Most children do this subconsciously, so mild distraction may help rather than directly telling him not to. Read more...

What can I do to prevent bacterial infections?

Good hygiene. The best way to prevent bacterial infections, or viral infections, is good hygiene. Wash your hand properly and often. Next come nutrition; your immune system works much better if you give it the proper tools to work with. Next comes sleep; not sleeping properly or enough has been shown to weaken the immune system and increase susceptibility to infections. Read more...