6 doctors weighed in:
Do immunizations help prevent sepsis in children?
6 doctors weighed in

Dr. William Walsh
Addiction Medicine
3 doctors agree
In brief: Yes, and adults too
Vaccination decreases the spread of serious bacterial infections through the population.
Since the main route of spread is through children in school/daycare, vaccinating these children reduces the risk of infection and sepsis in their parents and grandparents.

In brief: Yes, and adults too
Vaccination decreases the spread of serious bacterial infections through the population.
Since the main route of spread is through children in school/daycare, vaccinating these children reduces the risk of infection and sepsis in their parents and grandparents.
Dr. William Walsh
Dr. William Walsh
Thank
Dr. Marcus Degraw
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree
In brief: SOME do, yes
Some immunizations are aimed at infections that are responsible for some causes of sepsis.
Most are vaccines against particularly aggresive bacterial infections such as pneumococcus, haemophilus or neisseria meningitidis. All of those bacteria cause many cases of severe and often deadly septic infections per year. The vaccines have helped significantly reduce those numbers.

In brief: SOME do, yes
Some immunizations are aimed at infections that are responsible for some causes of sepsis.
Most are vaccines against particularly aggresive bacterial infections such as pneumococcus, haemophilus or neisseria meningitidis. All of those bacteria cause many cases of severe and often deadly septic infections per year. The vaccines have helped significantly reduce those numbers.
Dr. Marcus Degraw
Dr. Marcus Degraw
Thank
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