What is basal ganglia calcification?

BG Calcification . The basal ganglia are a part of the brain. It is common for calcifications to develop in these regions as we get older without clinical significance. In children this would be more worrisome.

Related Questions

My dr said I have basal ganglia and hemorrhage vs calcification what does that mean is wrong? Am I going to die?

May have had. a stroke, Need to have this further worked up. Especially if you have had a stroke you need to treat the primary problems such as hypertension or diabetes. See a neurologist and make sure you get a better explanatino. Read more...

I had a brain ct and they said everything was good/ normal. I just read report and it said Bilateral basal ganglia calcification/mineralization is noted. What does that mean? I am 42 and went in for symptoms that mirrored stroke a heart attack symptoms, b

Scarring, old injury. Calcification (buildup) of the basal ganglia or anywhere in the brain is a healing process for an injury, whether the cause is vascular, genetic (Parkinson's disease), infection, or other cause, that happens over many yrs. Ur description of ur symptoms is sparse. The CT is used to check if any abnormality EXPLAINS YOUR IMMEDIATE SYMPTOMS. Any other "abnormality" is irrelevant to ur primary doctor. Read more...

I had a head ct said all was normal, but report said Bilateral basal ganglia calcification/mineralization is noted. What is that? I had low potassium.

Usually of no signif. The basal ganglia are deep brain regions. While rarely calcification here can be related to significant brain injury cases, they are frequently seen as we age and of no significance. Read more...

Does blood pressure medicine cause basal ganglia calcification?

No. Basal ganglia calcification is more commonly seen in elderly. Blood-pressure medications are not typically associated with this finding. http://radiopaedia.org/articles/basal_ganglia_calcification. Read more...

What should ot evaluation cover in someone with basal ganglia stroke?

OT evaluation. Ot evaluation should cover areas involving fine motor controls such as holding and using your toothbrush, eating utensils, a pen, etc. Furthermore, if the stroke left any sensory problems such as unusual tactile sensations, intolerance of tastes, textures, sensation, sound - basically anything sensory - these should be evaluated by the ot as well. Best of luck to you. Read more...
Very important. An occupational therapist is indeed an integral part of a rehabilitation team, and will help with assistive devices, coping skills, use of impaired limbs, and the reacquisition of activites of daily living. Read more...

What two regions of the basal ganglia could, if inhibited, alleviate Parkinson's disease symptoms?

R U taking a test? Basal ganglia physiology is incredibly complex & knowledge is always changing. Practically speaking, you stimulate rather than inhibit. See the Medtronic website for pretty pictures and also see http://archneur.jamanetwork.com/Mobile/article.aspx?articleid=793103. Read more...