Any advice? What size breast implant do doctors put in when reconstructing the breast after a mastectomy?

Size to fit. Your plastic surgeon will take measurements of the chest to help determine what size implants to use. A woman who is 5'2", 100 lbs would not get the same implant as a woman who is 5'9" and 200 lbs for example, so the size varies from person to person.
Breast Implants. Breast implants are commonly used for breast reconstruction after mastectomy. The breast implants come in many different sizes and shapes. The selection of a breast implant depends on the size and shape of the normal remaining breast. Consult with a plastic surgeon certified by the american board of plastic surgery to learn about breast reconstruction options.

Related Questions

What size breast implant is used for the reconstruction of the breast after a mastectomy?

Size to fit. Your plastic surgeon will take measurements of the chest to help determine what size implants to use. A woman who is 5'2", 100 lbs would not get the same implant as a woman who is 5'9" and 200 lbs for example, so the size varies from person to person. Read more...
Match normal breast. In most instances of breast reconstruction, the goal is to achieve a size that is comparable to the pre-existing or opposite breast. When that is not possible a reduction of the opposite breast may be recommended. When fat grafting or tissue is used, and implant may not be necessary at all. Read more...
Individualized. There are a large variety of breast implants available. Exactly what size is utilized will depend on the specific patient's anatomy and goals. Sometimes, surgery on the opposite breast may be necessary to improve breast symmetry. Read more...
No good answer. It all depends on your frame, your original breast size, the size of the other breast (whether you want it bigger or smaller).... Too many variables so there is not really a clear answer to your question. Read more...
It depends. Breast reconstruction commonly utilizes implants either immediately after the mastectomy or later. When you meet with your plastic surgeon prior to surgery, you will discuss all of your options, including implant size. Clearly the average implant size will be greater than for cosmetic augmentation as the volume requirement is greater after the the breast tissue has been removed. Read more...

Could a tumor have grown in my breast implant after my mastectomy to cause my implant to pop? The implant suddenly appeared flat and causes pain.

Need to see your MD. If is saline implant may have leaked out, see your doctor first for recurrence of tumor and possible replacement of the implant , do not worry they do not pop out. Read more...
Not Likely. All implants break eventually. At your age it's hard to imagine a tumor. Go back to your surgeon for a check and replacement as soon as possible. The scar that normally forms around the implant gets smaller with time after rupture and makes replacement harder. Read more...
C Surgeon. It is most likely that you are experiencing breast implant leakage, unrelated and separate from any type of tumor growth. For accurate diagnosis and treatment recommendations see your plastic surgeon. Best wishes. Read more...
Deflation. Sounds like you have a deflation of a saline implant. This is usually related to a crack in the implant wall, and has nothing at all to do with any breast cancer tumor recurrence. See your plastic surgeon for an implant replacement. Read more...

Any doctor experienced in removing silicone breast injections in dallas, texas? I am seeking a bilateral mastectomy with cohesive gel implants.

Options. I refer patients to dr. Scott kasden in southlake for this kind of plastic surgery treatment. He is excellent. Read more...
Board Certified PS. I recommend you find a board certified plastic surgeon with experience in both reconstructive and cosmetic surgery. Silicone injections my require removal of more skin than usual and reconstructive surgery may require using your own tissue to replace any damaged skin. See the american board of plastic surgery, american society of plastic surgery and american society of aesthetic plastic surgery. Read more...

Hi I did breast implant one year ago but the scar still obvious like I did month ago! My doctor told me that my skin is the reason. What shoud I do?

Unfortunate. People heal differently and some end up with big thick scar tissue. Some may consider scar revision, which is cutting out the old scar, but you may end up with a similar scar once you heal. Speak with your doctor, consult a general or plastic surgeon, and best of luck! Read more...
Options. At 1 year, the scar should be mature. If the appearance is less than satisfactory, options include surgical revision or steroid injection. Everyone heals differently and some people are prone to problematic scarring. However, if the current scar bothers you, a revision may improve it ands a reasonable request.. Read more...
Scar treatments. There are many potential options for scar management beginning with avoidance of sun exposure and tobacco use, topical pressure and massage, silicone gel sheeting, injected steroids, and possibly even scar revision. Read more...
Unsightly scar . Everyone heals differently and genetics play a role in wound healing and scarring. At one year, a scar is considered mature. Options include a revision, 1540 nm laser treatment, and steroid injections with or without 5fu (fluorouracil). It would be helpful to see an image of your scars. Treatment depends on their appearance. Are the dark, raised, red, and/or itchy? Are both sides unsightly or just one? Read more...

Is breast implant removal a must if I was diagnosed with breast cancer? I am having a very hard time dealing with my diagnosis of breast cancer. On top of that, my doctor mentioned something about breast implant removal being necessary. I am not sure I wi

I'm . I'm sorry about your new breast cancer diagnosis. The answer to your question is very dependent on the treatment plan for your cancer. Having breast implants in place is not a big deal, if mastectomy will be used as the primary treatment for the breast cancer. Breast reconstruction can be performed at the time of the mastectomy. A large number of patients chose to undergo implant based reconstruction (vs flap surgery with your own tissue). Reconstruction is a surgical process, which means that patients will typically need more than 1 operation to complete the reconstruction. Typically, a tissue expander is placed at the time of mastectomy. The breast skin is expanded to a size that the patient is satisfied with. At a second operation, the expander is then replaced with a long-term breast implant. The final result is similar to a natural breast. The goal is to make patients feel comfortable in their clothes. After your reconstruction is complete, other people are unlikely to know that you ever had a mastectomy. Read more...
Not usually. It depends on the size of the cancer and the ability to obtain a negative margin around the cancer. The implants can stay if this is possible. Read more...
Not a must but.... I wonder why your surgeon has recommended this. Certainly you are entitled to obtain a second opinion. While i understand your reluctance for removal, please take this into perspective and do not let the decision to retain your implant interfere with management of the tumor. Read more...
The implant . (as opposed to tramflap) is a foreign body, and if you want to conserve the breast and implant, the first step is to rid the breast of tumor and see if there is an option (partial breast xrt) or not. When whole breast is needed, the fibrosis around the capsule of the implant can be painful and tight. You need surgeon, plastics, rad onc to iron out before you start. Read more...
Not Necessarily. Breast implant removal is not always necessary when surgery is being performed to treat breast cancer. Whether or not breast implant removal will be indicated will depend on exactly what is planned in your breast cancer treatment. Concerns that may come into play include size of the tumor, location of the tumor in proximity to the position of the breast implant, need for radiation therapy etc. Read more...
Unusual. Removal of a breast implant is not usually necessary for breast cancer treatment. When it is, the reason should be made clear to you. Ask you doctor why. I would assume that it is to provide you with the best care available. If they cannot provide a good reason, seek another opinion. I recently removed a breast implant for cancer treatment using heat with chemotherapy. It was replaced afterward. Read more...

My second breast implant surgery also resulted in encapsulation. My doctor said that they had 'memory' and that it would most likely happen with a third operation. Is ittrue?

Not necessarily. While your risks for recurrent capsular contracture are increased, I do not believe that it is inevitable. Use of a new implant, in a new or pseudo-pectoral pocket along with the anecdotal use of Accolate (zafirlukast) therapy may help to lower recurrence rates. Altehrnatively, grafting with your own fat ai an option. Read more...
Yes and no... Capsular contracture is the most common issue with breast augmentation surgery. If you have had two prior events i would suggest you speak with a board certified plastic surgeon in your area about using acellular dermis during your next surgery to help prevent a recurrence. Good luck! dr k. Read more...
Higth risk. Regrettably, the rates for recurrent capsular contracture, once you have developed one which is sufficiently deforming to require surgery or cause asymmetry and discomfort, is almost 2x that of the original surgery. You may consider capsulectomy & explantation with staged augmentation, using new implants, placed in a neosubpectoral plane and/or strattice. Read more...
Capsular contracture. Capsular contractures are a difficult problems because of their tendency to come back. I routinely will perform a complete capsulectomy for first time capsular contracture patients. If they reoccur, i will in addition to performing a capsulectomy, insert a collagen matrix called strattice which is commonly used in breast reconstruction to decrease the chances of it coming back. Read more...