How unusual is a renal carcinoid tumor?

VERY uncommon. Primary carcinoid tumor of the kidney is a very rare tumor. The current world health organization classification of tumors of the kidney (iarc press, lyon 2004) says that only about 50 cases have been reported in the world's literature. Hope that this helps.

Related Questions

Are the symptoms of carcinoid tumors bad?

Not always! The most common place to have a carcinoid is the appendix. When the tumor is there, and most of the other common locations which are in the intestinal tract, you don't feel anything because the liver removes the hormones the tumors produce. Only when the tumors are large, outside the intestinal tract, or metastatic do the symptoms occur. They can get very bad then. Read more...

What is the probability of a carcinoid tumor bursting?

Very Low. Carcinoid tumors are solid masses and unless they have died (necrosed) the chance of one bursting is very very unlikely. Read more...
Not likely. Its is not likely to burst but it should probably be removed, some of these are malignant. Read more...

Can you tell me the life expectancy ranges based on for carcinoid tumors?

Long yet variable. Carcinoid tumors are slow growing cancers which can exist in the body for 10-20+ years without causing a major threat to life. But this depends on where they are located and if they have spread to the liver or not. Liver spread does lead to increasing problems and some fatal outcomes, typically after 5 to 10+ years. It has a highly variable prognosis. Read more...

Is carcinoid tumor the same thing as cancer?

Yes. A carcinoid tumor is a specific type of malignancy developing from neuroendocrine tissues. Read more...
Carcinoid tumors. Are just one of the many different types of cancer that people can get. Read more...
Carcinoid tumor. A carcinoid tumor is neuroendocrine tumor. So yes, it is a kind of cancer. It's very unique, and relatively uncommon. Read more...

Can you have a carcinoid tumor on the lung, not in the lung?

Yes. I am guessing from your question, but yes there can be pulmonary and bronchial carcinoid tumors. They are both a type of lung tumor that can be benign or cancerous. They can occur in the lung or "on" the lung in the breathing tube to the lung. These are relatively rare tumors. Read more...
Yes. Carcinoids are cancers of Kulchitsky cell origin. In the chest they can be in the lung tissue, or arise from the walls of the tracheobronchial tree or in the thymic gland the last 2 of which could be considered "on" the lung. Typical carcinoids represent one end of the spectrum of lung cancers (more indolent) but another cancer derived from Kulchitsky cells - small cell cancers- are the deadliest. Read more...

Are carcinoid tumors benign?

No. Carcinoid tumors are not benign. They are typically (but not always) slower growing than other tumors. They can spread if not found and therefore should be removed. Read more...
No. Carcinoid tumors can spread like any other cancer. Symptoms are usually related to the substances produced by the tumor making it into the circulation. Read more...
Confusing. Carcinoid tumors are classified as typical or atypical depending on what they look like under the microscope and how this relates to how they behave clinically. Typical carcinoids are most often very slow growing and patients can live to die of other things. Atypical carcinoids will have a less predictable biology and are more likely to require treatment. Read more...

What are carcinoid tumors / syndrome?

Neuroendocrine tumor. It is a relatively benign type of tumor that can secrete a variety of hormones, most notably serotonin. They are most commonly found in the gut or the lungs. They do not come from the lining of the lungs or the gut (as adenocarcinomata do). They come from a different line of cells. Carcinoid syndrome occurs when large amounts of serotonin get into the bloodstream, assoc with flushing and diarrhea. Read more...

What are the tests for carcinoid tumors?

Biopsy. Confirmation of diagnosis is via a biopsy; other tests include blood tests (blood counts, chemistries, serotonin, chromogranin), urine tests (for 5hiaa) as well as ct scans and octreotide scans. Read more...