During coronary angioplasty how are catheters inserted into the femoral artery to the heart?

Depends. Depending on the arterial access , a single IV like catheter is placed called an arterial sheath. All catheters are fed thru the sheath using a j-shaped guide wire. Most sheaths are placed in the femoral artery others in the radial arteries. All arteries lead back to the heart in a retrograde fashion and the catheter is manipulated into the artery of intrest for repair with angioplaty and stent.

Related Questions

How can a cardiologist insert a catheter into a patients right femoral artery and then see the heart?

Cardiac cath. Cardiologists routinely access the arterial vessels at the top of either leg, the femoral artery, or from the arm, the radial artery. From here the catheter, or a guide wire is then fed through the arterial circulation into the heart. Just above the heart catheters are changed over a wire to access the left and right coronary arteries and the left ventricle. Read more...

How common is it for the femoral artery to be punctured during a heart cath and then need surgery to repair?

1% Bleeding at the puncture site occurs at approximately 1% of femoral catheterizations. There is a recent trend which originated in europe to perform cardiac catheterization from the radial artery approach. This almost completely eliminates the risk of bleeding from the puncture site. Read more...
Uncommon. Femoral artery aneurysm or pseudoaneuyrsm formation at the site of left heart catheterization is very uncommon, less than 1% of cases in the hands of an experienced interventional cardiologist. Read more...

How common is a femoral artery injury during a heart cath that needs surgery to repair?

Fairly rare. About 15-20 % of all femoral artery catheterizations have some type of complication, either bleeding or clotting. Much fewer than this actually require surgery. Read more...

Will atherosclerosis of the femoral artery affect heart beat and ekg?

No, but.... Not because of femoral artery atherosclerosis per se. However atherosclerosis is generally wide spread and if there is significant narrowing of the arteries of the heart, it can result in abnormal ekg and abnormal heart rhythm. Read more...
No. Ekgs measure the electrical activity of the heart. Palpitations ( irregular heartbeats) are also a function of the electrical activity in the heart. Neither of these will be affected by having atherosclerosis in the femoral artery of the leg. Read more...

Recent Coronary Angioplasty to relieve 90%/60% blockages of main arteries. Recent recurrence of AF, now stable NHB. Q: Is second ablation warranted?

There are many. ablative therapies for AF but without knowing your medical history and the nature of your previous treatment it is impossible to advise regarding your question. The Coronary artery disease treatment is most likely unrelated to your AF recurrence. This is a question for your health care providers as they have all the information about your previous care. Read more...