How can you get vericose veins?

Leaking valves. Varicose veins are a very common problem and they are due to leaking valves (called reflux) usually in the saphenous veins. Think of your veins like a tree with the trunk being the saphenous vein and the branches being the varicose veins. A venous reflux ultrasound will make the diagnosis. Common causes of this are hereditary, aging and pregnancies in women. They are treatable with a laser.

Related Questions

How to get vericose veins?

Leaking valves. Varicose veins are a very common problem and they are due to leaking valves (called reflux) usually in the saphenous veins. Think of your veins like a tree with the trunk being the saphenous vein and the branches being the varicose veins. A venous reflux ultrasound will make the diagnosis. Common causes of this are hereditary, aging and pregnancies in women. They are treatable with a laser.
Genetic. Varicose veins are typically genetically inherited. So if you are genetically predisposed then it is not a matter of if you will get them, it is a matter of when (they can form at any age, typically anywhere from teenage years into geriatric population). It occurs due to genetically faulty valves w/i certain leg veins. Other causes can be trauma, blood clots, or surgical injury. See vascular MD.
Swollen Veins. Varicose veins are swollen, bulging veins that protrude from the surface of the skin often with a blue or purplish color. They commonly have a rope-like or cord-like appearance on the skin. The veins contain valves that help to move blood through the vein. When those valves become damaged, the blood does not move through the veins as smoothly thus causing pooling or bulging.

If I sit for hours every day working, can my varicose veins get worse?

No. Sitting in and of itself does not lead to venous insufficiency and subsequent varicose veins. Prolonged immobility may lead to venous stasis and formation of thrombus, which can damage vein valves. Unmoving for long periods such 8 hours without standing or moving the calf muscle, and additional risks such as obesity might be present to truly increase risk. Best to get up and walk around.
No. Fortunately, sitting doesn't cause you to get varicose veins and doesn't make them worse, as dr. Bulger said. Standing is actually far harder on veins than sitting is. Sitting for long periods of time can make symptoms from varicose veins worse though, especially swelling. Getting up and taking 5 minute walks every hour or two can make a big difference.

How do you prevent getting varicose veins as you get older?

Compression devices. Compression devices directly address the damaged valves inside your veins. Which leads to venous hypertension. The compression squeeze decreases edema and tissue swelling, helps improve venous return. They are not a cure. But compression is first line therapy. Knee high devices generally are best tolerated.
Compression stocking. Compression stockings can help with leg swelling and possibly slowing the progression of the disease of venous reflux. They do fix the reflux but they can help with the symptomatlogy of swelling, pain and heavyness in the legs. They are considered first line treatment for varicose veins.
Maybe not much. There are several things that can probably help to prevent varicose veins. Unfortunately, even if you do everything right (use prescription compression stockings, don't stand too long, don't gain weight, get exercise, put your feet up as much as you can, etc.) varicose veins can develop anyway. Age and heredity increase tendency to get varicose veins. So there may be little you can do.

How do I get rid of varicose veins?

Choices. Injecttions are an option, surgery and laser treatments are other options. Your choices will depend on the reasons you have these veins. See a vascular surgeon or plastic surgeon to discuss your options.
Start with evaluatio. Treatment of varicose veins begins with a consultation with a vein specialist/phlebologist. A history, physical and duplex ultrasound are critical to understanding your particular pattern of vein problems. A treatment plan is devised based on this information, and could include endovenous ablation, phlebotomy &/or sclerotherapy. Treatment is often quite effective, although new veins may develop.
Ultrasound first. There are a number of good treatment options for getting rid of varicose veins. Major surgery isn't required any more. The first thing to do is to see a vein specialist/phlebologist. You need to have a standing venous ultrasound exam. The results will then determine what treatment options are available to you, as outlined by dr. Zimmett.
Close leaking valves. Varicose veins are a result of malfunctioning valves usually in the saphenous system. The first step in treatment would be to obtain a venous reflux ultrasound to make the diagnosis and help plan treatment which could be laser or radiofreqency closure of the valves usually with microphlebectomies and possible sclerotherapy or ultrasound directed sclerotherapy. You should see a vein specialist.

How can I get rid of vericose veins?

A number of things. I would see a vein specialist/phlebologist. A venous ultrasound of your leg veins should be done to find the cause of your varicose veins and make a treatment recommendation. A treatment option that helps symptoms but doesn't make the veins go away is compression stockings. Other more definitive options include laser or radiofrequency ablation, ambulatory phlebectomy, and/or sclerotherapy.
See your doctor. See a vascular surgeon, interventionalist, or a specialist in phlebology. There are multiple ways to treat varicose veins that are low risk and highly effective. The best treatment plan is individualized!
Many options. A venous ultrasound of your leg veins should be done to find the cause of your varicose veins and make a treatment recommendation. Treatments to get rid of the veins include laser or radiofrequency ablation, ambulatory phlebectomy, and/or sclerotherapy. Which treatment is done depends on the results of the ultrasound and the preference of the doctor.

How can I get rid of varicose veins?

For good info. Go to sirweb. Org. Click on patient tab at top of page. Then click on varicose veins at the left side of the page. There is a doctor finder also at this site, which can help you find an interventional radiologist in your area. This doctor can provide the diagnostic and the therapeutic care for your varicose veins.
See Vascular Surgeon. Varicose vein disease in a complex condition that needs thorough evaluation by a vascular surgeon prior to considering treatment. The therapy will depend on your particular anatomy, which is evaluated with ultrasound first. Based on your exam, the therapy could range from needing sclerotherapy to phlebectomy surgery to thermal catheter ablation. Vascular surgeons can provide all the treatments.

Could exercise get rid of varicose veins?

No. Varicose veins are due to leaking valves (reflux) usually of the saphenous veins. Exercise increases the calf muscle contractions to increase the venous return to the heart and decreases the venous back pressure but it does not address the underlying problem of leaking valves. You should see a vein specialist and have a full venous evaluation with a reflux venous ultrasound.
No. Varicose veins are the result of defective "plumbing" within your circulation. The valves within the veins have failed prematurely, and once the valves are failed, they are always failed. Exercise will not help the valves recover. In order to rid yourself of varicose veins, you will need some form or intervention, either laser, radiofrequency, sclerotherapy, surgery, or a combination of these.
Its the valves. Varicose veins are the result of defective valves. The valves within the veins have failed prematurely, and once the valves are failed, they are always failed. Exercise will not help the valves recover. In order to rid yourself of varicose veins, you will need some form or intervention, either laser, radiofrequency, sclerotherapy, surgery, or a combination of these. See a vein specialist.
Exercise. Once varicose veins have developed they will not resolve on their own, and is important to determine the source of the varicose veins to determine what treatment would work well. Sometimes vigorous physical activity can stimulate veins become more prominent due to increased muscle girth. These veins are not abnormal, but become more noticeable by the increasing muscle.

How can I get rid of ugly varicose veins?

Choices. Injecttions are an option, surgery and laser treatments are other options. Your choices will depend on the reasons you have these veins. See a vascular surgeon or plastic surgeon to discuss your options.
Good options. I would recommend that you visit with a vein speicalist/phlebologist who can evaluate your varicose veins and make recommendations as to the treatment options. Generally the treatment options may include laser or radiofrequency ablation, phlebectomy, and sclerotherapy or combinations of these treatments.
Start with a consult. There are a variety of treatments available. The exact treatment plan will depend on the pattern of disease present. Start with a consultation with a phlebologist, interventional radiologist, or vascular surgeon who is committed to treating vein disease. Evaluation will include a history and physical examination and an ultrasound examination, which should be done with the patient standing.
Often a combination. As was mentioned, start with a vein specialist. A venous ultrasound of your leg veins should be done to find the cause of your varicose veins and make a treatment recommendation. A treatment option that helps symptoms but doesn't make the veins go away is compression stockings. Other more definitive options include laser or radiofrequency ablation, ambulatory phlebectomy, and/or sclerotherapy.