3 doctors weighed in:

Please let me know if there is any solution to a schmorl's nodes?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. John Rhoades
Family Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: Below is summary

Treatment For Schmorl’s Nodes Again, most of these are not pain producing nodes and are noticed upon examination of back pain from another cause.
However, a small percentage of patients will have back pain that is not responding to typical therapies and have an MRI indicating a large Schmorl’s node surrounded by bone swelling. In these cases, treatment is warranted. Indications are that a surgical procedure called vertebroplasty may be effective, especially when found with osteoporosis. studies in using this cement type injection have reported about 80% success in these active schmorl’s nodes. Active nodes in association with degeneration and instability may benefit from fusion surgery. Often discography is done to confirm pain at the level in question prior to any fusion. Good success rates have been noted regarding pain relief and increased functional ability with those who have active Schmorl’s nodes, chronic, back pain not responsive to conservative treatment methods and positive response to discography. Active nodes have also responded to medications such as infliximab to reduce painful chemicals associated with marrow swelling. There are side effects that should be noted. Anyone who is familiar with my articles on modic type 1 changes should begin to notice a familiarity here. Nerve blocks have also noted improvement with painful Schmorl’s nodes. Based on the similarity of active Schmorl’s nodes and modic changes, when found in association with typical disc herniation and additional signs of modic changes, antibiotics following the same protocol for modic changes may be a reasonable approach. Although studies are lacking, there is too much in common to dismiss this type of therapy in select patients. - See more at: http://www.necksolutions.com/schmorls-nodes.html#sthash.6XvKu3Eo.dpuf

In brief: Below is summary

Treatment For Schmorl’s Nodes Again, most of these are not pain producing nodes and are noticed upon examination of back pain from another cause.
However, a small percentage of patients will have back pain that is not responding to typical therapies and have an MRI indicating a large Schmorl’s node surrounded by bone swelling. In these cases, treatment is warranted. Indications are that a surgical procedure called vertebroplasty may be effective, especially when found with osteoporosis. studies in using this cement type injection have reported about 80% success in these active schmorl’s nodes. Active nodes in association with degeneration and instability may benefit from fusion surgery. Often discography is done to confirm pain at the level in question prior to any fusion. Good success rates have been noted regarding pain relief and increased functional ability with those who have active Schmorl’s nodes, chronic, back pain not responsive to conservative treatment methods and positive response to discography. Active nodes have also responded to medications such as infliximab to reduce painful chemicals associated with marrow swelling. There are side effects that should be noted. Anyone who is familiar with my articles on modic type 1 changes should begin to notice a familiarity here. Nerve blocks have also noted improvement with painful Schmorl’s nodes. Based on the similarity of active Schmorl’s nodes and modic changes, when found in association with typical disc herniation and additional signs of modic changes, antibiotics following the same protocol for modic changes may be a reasonable approach. Although studies are lacking, there is too much in common to dismiss this type of therapy in select patients. - See more at: http://www.necksolutions.com/schmorls-nodes.html#sthash.6XvKu3Eo.dpuf
Dr. John Rhoades
Dr. John Rhoades
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