Is it true that an epiretinal membrane in the eye is the same as macular pucker?

Yes. Those terms mean the same thing. Additionally, sometimes a pucker is referred to as "scar tissue on the retina", and "epiretinal gliosis." when appropriate, surgery to remove the pucker may be a good idea to halt vision deterioration, or modestly improve vision. Best to see a retina specialist for this kind of problem.

Related Questions

Please tell me if an epiretinal membrane in the eye the same as macular pucker?

Yes and no. A macular pucker is often caused by an epiretinal membrane. But you can have an epiretinal membrane without a macular pucker. Read more...
Same. Those terms mean the same thing. Additionally, sometimes a pucker is referred to as "scar tissue on the retina", and "epiretinal gliosis." when appropriate, surgery to remove the pucker may be a good idea to halt vision deterioration, or modestly improve vision. Best to see a retina specialist for this kind of problem. Read more...

Is epiretinal membrane the same thing as macular pucker?

Yes. Yes, both terms describe the same condition. This condition results from a membrane forming from a remnant of vitreous that stays adherent to the retina after the vitreous separates from the retina. This condition may never cause visual issues, but in some people the membrane will wrinkle and may need to be surgically removed. Read more...
Yes. Another term for this is a wrinkle. They are often used interchangeably to describe a condition where a membrane grows over the retina. It often occurs spontaneously, and can remain stable or grow over time. Treatment is directed at peeling the membrane off the retina, and is usually not offered unless vision decreases below a certain level (20/50 or worse, depending on the surgeon). Read more...
Yes and no. The macula is the central part of the retina that gives us our ability to read and see fine detail. Epiretinal membranes tend to grow over the macula, contract and thus wrinkle our macula. This produces a wrinle in the macula that "puckers" it. Hence the term "macular pucker." surgery can remove epiretinal membranes and reduce symptoms in advanced cases. Read more...
Same. They both describe a thin layer of scar tissue which covers the macula and causes visual distortion. Read more...
Yes. Those terms mean the same thing. Additionally, sometimes a pucker is referred to as "scar tissue on the retina", and "epiretinal gliosis." when appropriate, surgery to remove the pucker may be a good idea to halt vision deterioration, or modestly improve vision. Best to see a retina specialist for this kind of problem. Read more...

Whats an epiretinal membrane in the eye?

Macular pucker. Epiretinal membrane is a disease of the eye in response to changes in the vitreous humor or more rarely, diabetes. It is also called macular pucker. Read more...
Wrinkle on Retina. Macular pucker or epiretinal membrane results in formation of a thin layer of scar tissue which distorts the retina. It is caused by cells migrating through a tiny hole or from inflammation. If the symptoms of blurring and distortion are severe enough, then surgery may be needed. Read more...
An uncommon problem. But, the likelihood of having this increases with age. The term epiretinal membrane means the same as macular pucker, and "scar tissue on macula." vision can be affected in two ways: blurring and distortion. Surgery is often recommended when the distortion is severe, or disruptive to vision using both eyes together, or when vision is very blurry (poor acuity). Surgery often improves things. Read more...

Is a macular scar the same thing as macular pucker in the eye?

Different. Macular pucker is due to condensation or wrinkling of the vitreous membrane overlying the macular area (central sharp vision) of the eye. Macular scar is the damaged concequence of trauma, bleeding or other insults to the macular area causing a permanent and observable change in the vision. Read more...
No. A macular scar is a replacement of the rod and cones (photoreceptors) in the macula. The normal tissue is no longer present, and one cannot expect a return of function, when the retinal cells no longer exist. A macular pucker refers to a loss of the smooth surface of the retina.The photoreceptors are present, but perceive images incorrectly because of the altered angle they project on the retina. Read more...
Could be... I generally agree with my colleagues that have already answered this question. However, there is one more thing to point out. Some retina specialists, refer to puckers or epiretinal membranes as "scar tissue on the macula." while that is not the same as a macular scar, it can sound very similar to a lay person, and yet to us retina specialists it is very different. Read more...